LONG ISLAND RAIL ROAD - MISCELLANEOUS DATA
Rev: 08/01/17

 

STEAM LOCOMOTIVES:

 

Class D16s superheated and converted to D16sb           Starting in 1914

 

 

Westbound steam trains changed head-end motive 

     power at “HAROLD” interlocking with PRR DD1s

     and crews and reversed the procedure eastbound     1910 – Autumn/1927

 

 

Steam trains changed head-end motive power at

     Jamaica and LIRR purchased 16 DD1 locomotives

     from the PRR to accomplish this change of power    Autumn/1927


Jamaica Yard at Hall Tower view SE c. 1950-51 Photo: Henry Barsky

 

PRR class E2 superheated and converted to E7s            By 1929

 

PRR class E2, E3 construction dates                              c. 1904 – 1906

 

K4s locomotives first used on Montauk branch            

   (After installation of heavier bridge over

   Shinnecock Canal.  Prior to that, Montauk                 June/1931

   trains of 12 or more cars were required to be

   double-headed by 2 - G5s locomotives)

 

Footplates appeared under cabs of PRR locomotives      1931-32

   (including LIRR G5s, H10s)

 

Pin-striping discontinued on PRR locomotives               June 13, 1932

 

Pedestal-type, multi-directional classification lights

   atop smokebox and pedestal-style multi-directional

   marker lights atop pilot introduced:                            Fall / 1922

          a.  Removed from yard service and freight-

                   service-only locomotives, beginning:           July /1929

                   Pedestal markers left atop pilot.

          b.  Removed from passenger service loco-

                   motives and freight locomotives in

                   passenger service, beginning:                     June / 1940

                   (The Keystone:  Spring/2002)

                   Pedestal markers left atop pilot.

         

           c.  “New” one-directional "tombstone"-shaped

                   marker lights introduced atop smokebox:   June / 1942
                   
(The Keystone:  Spring/2002)                            

 

          d.  Pedestal marker lights removed from atop       Starting in 1946-47

                   pilots (Some engines still had them in 1949)

          e.  Newer, smaller, round, single lens marker

                   lights appear atop smokebox replacing       1947

                   "tombstone"-shaped markers from 6/42


Futura lettering on tenders replaces Dulux gold            1940 – 1941

          “Penn Roman” font lettering

 

K-4s locomotives first used on Port Jefferson branch     1940 – 1941

 

PRR experimented with solid pilots on K4s locomo-      1941 - mid-1940s

          tives, but it wasn't until the mid-1940s that

          locomotives actually had the conversion

          (Photographic evidence shows a K4s at Jamaica

          on May 14, 1944 with solid pilot.  Ron Zinn data) 

 

Silver-gray smokebox color (graphite with aluminum)

          stopped during war years (dull gray in use)        1942 - 1945

 

Keystone number plate conversion                                Oct.- Dec. / 1942

 

Steam deflectors behind whistles                                   Starting in 1943

 

K4s locomotives used auto stokers                                 April/1944 - 1948

          (Stoker motor under cab: left side of loco)

 

Small, cast headlights with illuminated side num-

          bers installed on MOST G5s locomotives              1944 - 1945         

 

K4s locomotives get “facelift” (Generator exchanged       1945 on PRR, latter

          with headlight and large platform added be-           part of 1946 on LIRR

          low smokebox to service the generator) (Not            All are done by 1949

          done to K2s or K3s locomotives)                                                         

                                                                                               

Keystones have large numbers                                       Pre-1945

 

Keystones have smaller numbers                                   1945

 

Mechanical stoker added to fireman's side of H10s       

          locomotives                                                           1946

 

H10s #113 last to be mechanically stokered                  1947

 

Last PRR L1 Mikados in service                                     as of 1/1/47 (all gone

                                                                                                by 7/1/48)

 

Class C51 has large tool box added to pilot                    1948

 

E6s, H9s leased locomotives left LIRR service                 1949

 

Montauk trains dieselized                                              1950                    

 

Last three (3) K4s leased locomotives left LIRR               October, 1951

service (#s 3740, 3887, 5406) (Ron Zinn data)

 

Greenport passenger trains dieselized                            October, 1951

 

Majority of G5s locomotives retired                                November, 1951

 

PRR G5s #5741 appeared on LI as relief engine for

          LIRR G5s #21                                                       August, 1955

 

Last steam-pulled revenue trains (behind G5s #’s          October 8, 1955

          35 and 39)


10/08/1955 Hicksville Engine #39 and car #2924 facing east & engine #35 and car #2923 facing west. Later, Alco diesel #1555 replaced #35 & #1556 replaced #39. #1555 operated back to Riverhead with #2923, but returned to Jamaica at 6:00PM with a different car of the same type. Photo: John Krause Archive: Gary Everhart

 

Last operation of LIRR steam: pulling railfan extra        October 16, 1955

          (behind G5s #35)


LIRR G5s #35 and final "Steam Special" at Port Jefferson Station ready to depart on the very last LIRR steam train run, October 16, 1955.  FM C-Liner 2402 at trackside. Photo: Art Huneke

 

 TENDERS:

 

"Lines West" Tenders on H10s Locomotives: 

All nineteen H10s locomotives that came to the LIRR from the Pennsy were "Lines West" engines.  They all carried high numbers on the Pennsy as did all "Lines West" engines:  in the 7000-8000 range.  The smaller tenders that some of the pre-stokered engines hauled were also "Lines West."  (Data courtesy of Ron Zinn)


 

9000 gallon Class 90P70 tender was originally built with the Pennsy I1 class decapods.  Over a hundred of these tenders were transferred to K4 engines during the 1930's when the I1's received larger ones.   Virtually all K4's that ran on LI from the late thirties until the arrival of the stoker fired engines in early 1944 had these tenders.  What is interesting is that 

these tenders did show up from time to time on E6's, K2's and even H9's.

(Data courtesy of Ron Zinn)

 

  

Smokebox Data:

Engine smokeboxes were painted with graphite paint because it is heat-resistant and the smokeboxes did not have "lagging" or insulation under the outer boiler shell.  On the Pennsy (Long Island), until late 1942,  regulations called for the smokeboxes to be painted with "front end paint".  This was graphite paint with a small (about 1/4 lb. to a gallon) amount of aluminum pigment added.  It gave the front end a silvery-black appearance.  This was the way engines usually appeared after receiving class repairs at Altoona. Varying amounts of aluminum pigment was added to the graphite paint, which is black or so dark a gray it looks like black, depending on what facility was servicing the engines.  It was probably at the discretion of those in charge of a particular facility.  For example, engines serviced at Altoona usually had a flat black look to the front end but engines serviced at Philadelphia had a silver-gray appearance, or at Wilmington, a lighter silver-gray appearance.

 

On the LIRR before the war, the silvery smokeboxes were often wiped down only on the front of the engine.  One would commonly see a grimy, soot covered smokebox. At times the boilers of many engines would appear to be all black when viewed from the side.  Black and white photography can be deceiving when it comes to rendering black.  A clean engine looks very black because locomotive enamel was a glossy paint. When it gets sooty and dusty it can look like light gray when the sun hits it.  Smokebox paint was a relatively flat color compared to the finish of the rest of the engine.  My own vivid memory of LI locomotives, which goes back to early 1943, is  that their front ends looked black.  Bob Sturm, who is several years older than I am, agrees with me.  The late Herb Doscher, engineman, who had a phenomenal memory about LI motive power also agreed that during the war smokeboxes were dark.  I actually have a color photo from the cover of a Newsweek magazine taken at Dunton tower in 1943 and it shows a G5 with a black smokebox.

 

On passenger engines the smokebox door and lugs were painted a glossy black.  Freight engines and switchers did not get the black door treatment. For some reason the light Atlantics (E3sd, E7s) did not get black smokebox doors either.

 

I have also seen a photo of a G53 with a black smokebox door. It was one of the G53's that had a passenger pilot as they were occasionally used in pass- enger service.  Incidentally, this paint scheme went back, at least, to the

first decade of the twentieth century.

 

This practice was never revived after the war although for a brief period in 1947, some of the K4's were given very light silvery smokeboxes with black doors.

 

For whatever reason no other engines received this paint treatment. After the war, until the end of steam, smokeboxes were varying shades of silver-gray depending on how dirty they were.  (Data courtesy of Ron Zinn)

 

 

Headlight Data:

When the Pennsy started to electrify their headlights, they retained the old oil headlight casings on many engines.  This lasted well into the 1920's in some cases.  They started using electric headlights around 1918.  I think the round cased headlights first appeared during 1922 along with the cast "helmet" type marker lights.  For a while some engines retained the platform that the oil headlights were mounted on so the replacement round headlights sat somewhat lower on the front of the smokebox.  (Data courtesy of Ron Zinn)

 

G5s-43-Lay-up Track East of HALL-Jamaica-3-6-37 (closeup).jpg (117494 bytes)
G5s #43 Lay-up Track east of HALL
Jamaica 3/06/37 Archive: Dave Keller

G5s-50, 42, 24-Oyster Bay-1950 (Sommer-Keller) close up.jpg (107590 bytes)
G5s #50 Oyster Bay 1950 (Sommer-Keller)

   

Superheater Data:

Older locomotives had the old slide valve chests instead of the more modern piston valves, hence the lack of the usual steam delivery pipes.  See "Classification Letters" following.

 


Classification Letters:

When the Pennsy (and therefore the LIRR after 1900) built or used other builders' locomotives and classified them, they were given a letter/number combination.  When an updated version of the same class was produced, it was identified with a letter added as a suffix to the class i.e. "a" or "b".  When the locomotive was superheated . .. either when built or when a superheater was added at a later date, a letter of "s" was added.  For example:

 

Class D16b, when superheated, was classed D16sb. A "D" class, for example, designated a 4-4-0 "American" type wheel arrangement, hence a DD1 electric locomotive, while not steam, had a 4-4-0 wheel arrangement and was classified accordingly as a "DD"  because the units always operated in pairs ("A" and "B" units = 2 "D" units, coupled).

 

Class K2, when modified AND superheated, was classed K2sa and when modified even further, was classed K2sb.

 

Class H6b, when superheated, was classed H6sb.

 

PRR Leasing Info:

Form MP229 listed the PRR-leased locomotives that were on the LIRR property by month and year.  Some locomotives came over for a brief period of service and were returned.  Some locomotives went back and forth numerous times.  Some locomotives spent many years on LIRR property and some spent nearly their entire career on site.  By October, 1951, all PRR-leased steam was gone from the LIRR with one odd exception occurring in August, 1955 as indicated in "STEAM LOCOMOTIVES" section above.

 

 

GAS CARS:

Gas cars replaced the use of locomotives                        10/19/1927

          on the Sag Harbor branch


Brill self-propelled Gas Car #1134 ("Doodlebug") at Sag Harbor station 7/05/1931

 

ELECTRIC LOCOMOTIVES:

 

Display of indication lights on the front of MUs is         11/27/32

   discontinued

 

Class DD1 gets pin-striped for N.Y. World’s Fair.           1939

   New color scheme includes LIRR keystone logo

 

Class DD1 @ Morris Park Shops begins use of

  new DD1 lay-up yard near elevated Montauk              1944

  branch                                                                        

 

Some class DD1 units get Tichy color scheme               early 1950

 

Last day of DD1 operation (Locomotive assignment       06/22/51

sheet for 12/31/51 shows 3 DD1s on the roster

[#s 341, 348, 352] but were probably in storage at

Morris Park Shops. Assignment sheet for 02/29/52

shows them gone from the roster.  Ron Zinn data)

 

PASSENGER CARS:

 

Beach Storage Battery Car #1 begins operations on      04/01/1911

   L.I.R.R. and is the 1st battery car to operate on a

   steam railroad (per "Railway Age Gazette" issue

   of 11/22/1912)  The car ran along the Bushwick

   branch between Fresh Pond (Bushwick Jct.) and

   Bushwick.

 

T39 class wooden trailers used in alternating pattern    Dec. 17, 1914

   between steel MP41 cars in same train withdrawn

   from service.  Majority of wooden cars sold to the

   Washington, Baltimore & Annapolis RR in 1917

   and 1924.

 

Last year wooden cars used in revenue service               1927

 

Futura lettering                                                              1940 – 1941

 

Old-style Dulux gold lettering in “Penn Roman”            1942

font re-done with letters spaced further

apart                                       

 

Original 1905-era class MP41 MU cars last ran in         1950

 passenger service on Mitchel Field shuttle:

 

Tichy color scheme:  Slate gray body, dark green           Beginning 11/1/49

   undercarriage, bright aluminum roof                              until 11/1/52

   Named for designer Lester C. Tichy (1905-1981)         (period of painting)

                            

Large marker light added to rear of steam cars.

Headlight of electric cars modified to be large                May 24, 1951

   marker light when used as last car on train

 

MU cars end doors painted orange                                 Starting in 1952

 


(FOR MORE INFO SEE: "PAINT SCHEMES" BELOW)

 

TRAIN INFORMATION:

 

“REX” Trains = Trains consisting of all REA and/or baggage cars

 

Mitchel Field Shuttle:

Shuttle service begun between Garden City station and                   05/03/1898

          newly-established Camp Black via the Central

          branch.

 

Shuttle service between Garden City station and Salisbury    1915-1918

          Plains implemented using ex-Ocean Electric trolleys

          equipped with third rail shoes to operate on the elec-

          trified Central branch.  During WWI service cut back

          and terminated at Aviation Field #2 also servicing ad-

          jacent Camp Mills.  After 1918, Aviation Field #2 re-

          named Mitchel Field.  Service re-established beyond

          Mitchel Field to Salisbury Plains.

 

Shuttle service western terminus moved to Country Life         1927

          Press station.

 

Shuttle service trolleys replaced by one MP41 MU electric       1933

          car.  One-car train became 2-car train sometime after

          April, 1934.  These were the last MP41 cars in oper-

          ation on the LIRR.

 

Shuttle service MP41 MU cars replaced by two MP54 MU       1950

          cars.

 

Mitchel Field Shuttle last day of service                                   05/15/53

____________________________________________

 

 

Train service inaugurated to Kings Park State Hospital           1911

 

Train service inaugurated to Central Islip State Hospital         1911

 

Milk service started to Sheffield Farms at Dunton        04/25/28

(per Dick Makse data)

 

PRR “K” card system in service                                                05/23/28

 

Train service inaugurated to Pilgrim State Hospital                 06/24/34

Trains #7, #13 on Sundays and #19 on Mondays were the     June-Sept. 20,

          last westbounds to use the Manorville branch.                  1942

 

 

Train #20 the "Cannonball"  last operates along Manorville    June, 1944

          branch.  (Art Huneke data)

 

Train #12 the "Shinnecock Express" bound for Montauk        Sept, 1946

          via the Main Line with train #206 as its Greenport

          section splitting at Manorville, last operates along

          Manorville branch.  (Ron Zinn and Art Huneke data)

          Branch officially abandoned:  3/3/49 (Robt. Emery

          data).  After Sept, 1946, no scheduled trains used the

          branch.   The junctions at MR and PT and branch

          tracks were removed per G.O.#1710 eff. 12/27/49. 

 

Last day for mail carried on the LIRR on westbound train #37        June 18, 1965
            Speonk to Jamaica.

 

Last hospital train providing service onto Kings Park State     timetable of 5/69

          Hospital grounds                                       

 

Last hospital train providing service to Kings Park State         timetable of 5/70

          Hospital terminating on the Kings Park station

          siding with bus and cab service to the hospital             

 

Last year of the hospital train providing service to                   1971

          Central Islip State Hospital     

 

Hicksville shuttles with push-pull trains commence:              June 26, 1972  

Last hospital train to Pilgrim State Hospital and return           5/21/78

 

 

PARLOR CAR SERVICE:

 

Parlor car service provided by Woodruff Parlor Car        1870s - 1892

     Company                                                                 

 

LIRR takes control of Woodruff property and oper-        1892 - April 1, 1926

     ates their own parlor service                                    

 

Pullman Company service inaugurated, using               April 1, 1926 – Labor

     Pennsy’s pool of Pullman equipment                                 Day/1942

 

PRR takes over parlor service                                         1946 – 1958

 

LIRR Special Services Department formed                     1957

 

LIRR acquires 2 parlor cars and develops its parlor       October, 1958

     service

 

 

 

STRUCTURES & YARDS:

 

Reference in newspaper article to a turntable being

in place at Creedmoor after the line was cut back to

that station:                                                                   May, 1882

Reference in newspaper article to a turntable being

in place at Manor (Manorville) prior to the 1887

installation of the wye:                                                   June 10, 1882

 

Wye installed at Manor (Manorville):                              1887

 

Morris Park Shops opened:                                            1889

 

Large coaling tower at L. I. City built:                            1902-03

 

 

Turntable on dock adjacent to Dutch Kills, L. I. City

     built:                                                                         1903-04

 

Storage tracks at L. I. City added:                                  1903-04

 

North Yard (Wheelspur Yard) enlarged and connect-      1903-04

     ion via double slip switches to Dock Yard south

     of tracks at Dutch Kills installed:                             

 

Holban Yard (Hillside/Hollis, NY) opened:                     1906

   (Name was a combination of Hollis and St. Albans)

 

Station signs indicating mileage from L. I. City              Sept. 8, 1910

     and mileage to end of branch discontinued

     with opening of Pennsylvania Station and

     mileage now being determined from that

     terminal. (mileage from Penn Sta. indicated

     in employee timetables eff. that date with

     the exception of the Montauk branch which

     still used L. I. City as its terminal.)

 

Morris Park wooden coaling tower built                         1911

 

Morris Park smoke washer bridge and

mechanism installed                                            1914

 

Branch terminal engine houses razed by PRR edict       Beginning in 1928

(Oyster Bay razed:  8/4/29)

 

PRR Keystone signs on stations                                     Starting in late 1929

 

PRR Keystone signs on towers                                       Starting in 1937

          (“BS” tower got a make-shift keystone

          sign in 1929 per LIRR valuation photo)

 

Morris Park roundhouse:

Fascia above bays removed                                   1935-36

 

Morris Park wooden coaling tower razed                        Winter/1944-45

 

Morris Park concrete coaling tower built                        Fall/1944

 

Cone-style roof removed from Morris Park Shops           1944

water tower          

 

Morris Park smoke washer mechanism removed            Spring/1945

          from support bridge                                             

 

Morris Park smoke washer bridge removed                    July/1946

 

Overhead piping near Morris Park locomotive shop       Early 1946

and turntable “garden” tracks in use                   

 

Full 2nd floor added over Jamaica station waiting          Sept. 1, 1961

          room  and opened for service  (per The Long

          Island Railroader)         

 

Speonk yard and wye torn up and removed for              1997

          replacement yard

 

PAINT SCHEMES:

 

Tuscan Red with Dulux gold lettering in “Penn             Until 1940-41

   Roman” font (all passenger cars, loco tenders)

 

Tuscan Red with gold Futura lettering                           1940-41

   (some passenger cars, loco tenders)

 

Tuscan Red with Dulux gold lettering in “Penn             1942-1950+

   Roman” font spaced further apart (all passenger

   cars, loco tenders)      

 

Baldwin units delivered in black with gold lettering      Starting 1945-1955

   and numbers in “Penn Roman” font. Pilots

   painted white at a later date.

 

ALCO S1, S2 units delivered in black with gold             Starting 1946–1955

   lettering and numbers in “Penn Roman” font.

   Pilots painted white at a later date.

 

ALCO RS1 units delivered in black with gold                Starting 1949-advent

   lettering and numbers in “Penn Roman” font                of Tichy                                

Tichy color scheme:  Slate gray body, dark green           Beginning 11/1/49

   undercarriage, bright aluminum roof                              until 11/1/52

   Named for designer Lester C. Tichy (1905-1981)            (Period of painting:
   Applied to all psgr cars, some DD1 electric locos,           Lasted through

 an  elec. shop switcher and ALCO RS1 units.                      1955)

 RS1 units repainted up until 11/1/52. Only loco-

 motives wore the Long Island shadowed map logo.

 FM C-liners arrived in this scheme in Jan. 1950.


LIRR holds press run of 5 new air-conditioned              05/23/55

   P72 cars to Greenport.  Tichy scheme abandoned

   in favor of dark gray body and dark green roof. 

 

Dark gray with orange end doors and dark green          1955-1961

   roof   (per "The Keystone" magazine)

 

Dark gray with orange nose (diesel locomotives)            1955-1961

 

“Dashing Dan” logo added (per “Long Island Rail-                   February, 1959

 roader”, Issue of 2/12/59)

 

Charcoal gray (Goodfellow gray) (all psgr. cars)              1962-1964

Charcoal gray (Goodfellow gray) with orange nose

   (diesel locomotives)

**see “Misc. LIRR Trivia” for more

 

Charcoal gray with orange stripe (N.Y. World’s Fair       1964-1968

   colors:  passenger cars) (World's Fair motto re-
   moved sometime after end of Fair: c. 1965-1966)

         

 

Charcoal gray (Goodfellow gray) with orange wave        1964-1968

   (diesel locomotives)

 

MTA blue and yellow (diesel locomotives)                       1968-1976

 

MTA Platinum Mist (passenger cars)                              1968-end of push-

                                                                                         pull service

EMPLOYEES:

 

Towermen begin working 8-hour days.  3rd shift            October, 1907

     (trick) added to jobs as a result.

                  

Crossing Watchmen and Trafficmen were both              Until 1928 – early

     part of the LIRR Police Department.                                   1930s

    “Trafficman” was a promotion from “Crossing

     Watchman.”  When the PRR took over actual

     operation of the LIRR they both made part of

     the MOW Dept.  A Watchman or Trafficman

     could bid for a job in the track dept and vice

     versa.  The uniform gradually disappeared

     starting with this transfer of authority.  The

     job eventually went from prestigious to run-

     of-the-mill.  (Information per Art Huneke:  11/8/07)

 

 

 

Long Island Rail Road
Diesel Locomotives and Other Equipment Named in Honor of LIRR Employees

(Researched by Dave Keller)

 

(Thanks to Douglas Nash and Bob Meoli for additional data that was not available to me through photographic evidence.)

 

GP38-2 Units:

 

#251           “Bill Jeffries – Operation Desert Storm” (System Road Foreman of

                             Engines)

                   “Joe Ciminello – 1943-1994” (Engineer)

 

#252           “Tony Tancredi” (Engineer)

 

#253           "Peter Veltri - Operation Desert Storm" (position?)

 

#254           “Eric J. Enck – Operation Desert Storm” (Asst. Conductor)

 

#256           “Edward F. Case – 1959 – 1992” (Maintenance of Equipment

                             Foreman)

 

#257           "Paul Pumbonyo" - Operation Desert Storm” (Conductor)

 

#259           “John A. Cosman” (Engineer)

 

#260           "John Henderson - Operation Desert Storm" (position?)

                   “Nick Feliciano – Engineer of the Year” (1994)

 

#261           "Glynn Johnson - Operation Desert Storm" (Engineer)

 

#262           “R. B. Giannuzzi” (Engineer)

 

#264           “Clyde Hancock” (Engineer)

 

#266           “Joe ‘Jo Jo’ Glorioso – Operation Desert Storm” *** (Engineer)

 

#268           “John ‘Tanky’ Bell, Jr.” (Engineer)

 

#269           “George B. McSherry” (Engineer and Gen’l Chairman: BLE, local

                             269)

 

#272           “Robert Franke” (Engineer)

 

#274           "Carlos Cintron - Operation Desert Storm" (Policeman)

 

#275           “Marvin Blaine” (Engineer)

 

#276           “Kenneth S. Carman” (Engineer)

                   “William F. Baker” (Engineer)

 

#277           “Walter Schlager, Jr.” (President)

 

 

*** “’Jo Jo’ comes from his sideline of being a clown and it came in handy when he was in Desert Storm as he entertained the troops and local children.”   Bob Meoli, LIRR Engineer, retired

 

 

 

 

SW1001 Units: 

 

#102           “Lawrence Vedilago” (Maintenance of Equipment Foreman)

 

#103           “Robert B. Dunnet” (Yardmaster)

 

#104           “Levi R. Brown” (Maintenance of Equipment Foreman)

 

 

ex-FA Power Cab Unit:

 

#3100         “R. ‘Buff’ Stickevers” (position?)

 

 

 

Long Island Rail Road

 

Diesel Locomotives Named in Honor of Those Who Saved Lives in the Colin Ferguson Massacre

 

On December 7, 1993, Colin Ferguson, a disturbed black man who supposedly was in fear of white people boarded a LIRR train and began shooting random passengers as the train pulled into the Merillon Ave. Station west of Mineola, killing 6 and injuring 19.  The riders named below helped to overpower him and stop the killing.

 

FL9AC Units:

 

#300           “Kevin Blum”

 

#301           “Mark McEntee”

 

#302           “Mike O’ Connor”

 

 

 

Long Island Rail Road

Miscellaneous Named Equipment

 

 

Caboose #61         “J. J. Shurman - Freight Conductor -1946-1976”

 

MISCELLANEOUS:

 

LIRR keystone logo with “Long Island” spelled in full:   1906

Photograph extant of the new ferryboat “Hempstead,”

built in 1906, on her shakedown run, sporting key-

stone logos on her twin stacks. (Logo first appears

on LIRR passes in 1914.)

 

First LIRR employee timetable (ETT No. 42) in              May 17, 1907

bound format resembling PRR-style ETTs. (Pre-

vious ETTs had to be folded in half to fit in uniform

pockets.)

 

Manual block system goes into effect HX tower              ETT #82

(Hicksville) to PT cabin (Eastport), [via the Manor-         Eff: 06-28-16

ville-Eastport branch] with signal stations at B

cabin (Bethpage), SG cabin (Brentwood), KO cabin

(Ronkonkoma) and MR cabin (Manorville)

(Art Huneke data)

 

LIRR keystone logo with “LIRR” intertwined first           1917

appears on LIRR advertisements in the travel

magazine “The Open Road” and in the outdoor

sports and games magazine “Following the Ball”.

(Info and photographic proof courtesy of Art Huneke)                                          

 

Manual block system goes into effect HX tower              ETT #87

(Hicksville) to Greenport with train order and block      Eff: 05/28/18

offices at HX, PK (Central Park), B (Farmingdale),

P (Pinelawn station), WK (Wyandanch), DK (Deer

Park), SG cabin (Brentwood), CI station (Central

Islip), KO cabin (Ronkonkoma), HV (Holtsville),

MD (Medford), YA (Yaphank), WC cabin (Camp

Upton), MR cabin (Manorville), AH (Calverton),

RH (Riverhead), AQ (Aquebogue), R (Jamesport),

K (Mattituck), GU (Cutchogue), NC (Peconic), SD

(Southold) and GN (Greenport) (Art Huneke data)

 

First LIRR employee timetable (ETT No. 108) in             May 23, 1928

official PRR-style bound format with station list-

ing in front by branch and blank pages in back

on which general orders were to be pasted

 

First use of position light signal in lieu of sema-            Joint General Order:

phore signal on Long Island was on eastbound             NY, NH & HRR G.O. #3

track #2, New York Connecting Railroad track and       Long Island RR G.O.

was located on signal bridge 1,620’ east of “H”              #108-5 Pennsylvania RR

interlocking station.                                                       G.O. #706 (Zone A – N.Y.

                                                                                      Division) Eff:  6/25/28

 

First use of position light signals in lieu of sema-          G.O. #109-11. Eff:  

phore signals ON A LIRR branch was at automatic        5/15/29 in ETT #109,

block signal R143 on track 2 east of Hammel                  Eff: 10/17/28

Rock. Beach branch)

 

“Dashing Dan” logo first introduced to the public on     1956

The back cover of the LIRR Annual Report (per “Long

Island Railroader”, Vol. 2, No. 22: 10/24/57)

 

“Dashing Dan” logo begins being applied to loco-          February, 1959

motives and passenger cars (per “Long Island Rail-

roader”, issue of 2/12/59)

 

 

“Dashing Dan” logo appears on Form LI-1 system         06/21/59

          Timetables

 

MTA "M" logo appears on timetables                              11/25/68

 

LIRR turns over all freight operations to the newly        05/11/97

created New York & Atlantic Railway (NY&A) with

a 20-year lease. "POND" interlocking tower in Fresh

Pond becomes property of the NY&A.

 

PRR class B74b horse cars with3 baggage doors per side used for transporting horses to and from the LI racetracks. 

 

 

WHITE FLAGS FOR EXTRA TRAINS:

 

The LIRR Book of Rules of 1926 and the PRR Book of Rules of 1925 both have Rule 21: 

 

"EXTRA TRAINS WILL DISPLAY TWO WHITE FLAGS AND, IN ADDITION TWO WHITE LIGHTS BY NIGHT, IN THE PLACES PROVIDED FOR THAT PURPOSE ON THE FRONT OF THE ENGINE."

 

 

The PRR Book of Rules has Rule 21a: 

 

"(DOUBLE, THREE OR MORE TRACKS.)  ON PORTIONS OF THE RAILROAD SO SPECIFIED ON THE TIME-TABLE, THE DISPLAY OF WHITE FLAGS AND WHITE LIGHTS, AS PRESCRIBED BY RULE 21, WILL BE OMITTED ON ALL EXTRA TRAINS, EXCEPT PASSENGER EXTRAS."

 

Added to the LIRR 1926 BoR is a sticker making Rule 21a effective but no date is indicated.  The PRR “took over” in 1928 and may have replaced the LIRR book with theirs.

 

ETT # 3 of June 23, 1935 has Rule 21b:

 

"DOUBLE, THREE OR MORE TRACKS.  ON PORTIONS OF THE RAILROAD SO SPECIFIED ON THE TIMETABLE, THE DISPLAY OF WHITE FLAGS AND WHITE LIGHTS, AS PRESCRIBED BY RULE 21, WILL BE OMITTED.  REGULAR TRAINS MUST BE DESIGNATED BY BOTH SCHEDULE AND ENGINE NUMBER."  

 

They were entirely eliminated in September, 1939.  (Data/research courtesy of Art Huneke)

 

 

FERRY SERVICE:

 

Annex Boats were operated by the PRR from Exchange Place in Jersey City to Downtown Brooklyn. This was one way Long Islanders connected with Pennsylvania RR Trains.

After the opening of Pennsylvania Station in 1910, the ferry service was replaced with two railroad shuttles using MU cars. One operated hourly by the PRR from Exchange Place to Penn Station, and the other operated by the LIRR from Penn Station to Brooklyn via the Glendale Cut-off and Woodhaven Junction. The fare was 30 cents.

The LIRR portion was the first line from Penn Station to be discontinued on August 31, 1911.

 

REMITTANCES:

 

Remittance in cash was sent via express messenger.  Years back it was most likely the Long Island Express Company.  The cash would be placed in a heavy envelope, sealed, and large needle with heavy thread/twine shoved through the cash remittance to keep anyone along the way from sneaking one or two bills out of the batch without cutting the string, and sealing wax melted over the ends of the string and the envelope seal and embossed with the metal wax sealer of the specific station.

 

This procedure was explained by George G. Ayling, Agent/operator at CI who, back in 1909, started his LIRR career as an express messenger at Brentwood.

 

EXPRESS SERVICES:

 

Corwin & Munsell Express                                           1858 - 1868

 

United States Express Co.                                                     ?

 

Westcott’s Long Island Express                                    c. 1869 - 1882

 

Dodd’s Express                                                             1882

 

Long Island Express Co., created by the LIRR,              1882 - 1913

     handled local baggage and express shipments.

 

Adams Express Co., a nation-wide concern, took          1913- July 1, 1918

     over L. I. Express and allowed through-express

     service to the nation.

 

American Railway Express Co. was created during      July 1, 1918-

     WWI by the United States Railroad Administration   March/1929

     (USRA) which nationalized the express businesses

     of Adams Express Co, American Express Co.,

     Southern Express Co. and Wells, Fargo & Co.

     Express.  (Federal administration ended in 1920).

 

American Railway Express Co. was transferred to          March/1929

     the Railway Express Agency (REA) which was

     owned and operated by 86 American railroads.

 

GENERAL DATA:

 

 

GENERAL ORDER #60, EFFECTIVE 5/24/09:

BETHPAGE BRANCH (Bethpage Jct. to Bethpage Brick Works) WILL BE CONSIDERED A SIDING.

 

GENERAL ORDER: EFFECTIVE 1921:

BETHPAGE AND CREEDMOOR BRANCHES AND CENTRAL EXTENSION “HC”

TO BETHPAGE JCT. WILL BE CONSIDERED SIDINGS.

 

GENERAL ORDER #111-25C, EFFECTIVE 1/8/30:

MONTAUK BRANCH:  END OF DOUBLE TRACK, LOCATED 4,135’ EAST OF SAYVILLE STATION, RELOCATED 3,000’ WEST OF FORMER LOCATION (ACCOUNT MONTAUK HWY. [ROUTE 27] GRADE CROSSING ELIMINATION PROJECT.)

 

GENERAL ORDER #111-5B/49C, EFFECTIVE 5/14/30:

MANHATTAN BEACH BRANCH:  MAIN TRACK FROM EMMONS LANE TO

AVENUE Z, OUT OF SERVICE

 

GENERAL ORDER #113-19C, EFFECTIVE 2/16/31:

WEST LEG OF WYE, EASTPORT, OUT OF SERVICE.

 

GENERAL ORDER #113-30C, EFFECTIVE 4/14/31:

MAIN LINE:  LETTER “G” REMOVED FROM ALL AUTOMATIC BLOCK SIGNALS.

 

GENERAL ORDER #115-18C, EFFECTIVE 2/19/32:

FLUSHING-BRIDGE STREET, COLLEGE POINT, MALBA, WHITESTONE AND WHITESTONE LANDING STATIONS AND STATION FACILITIES, OUT OF SERVICE.

 

GENERAL ORDER #117-6C, EFFECTIVE 1/21/33:

STEAM LOCOMOTIVES ARE RESTRICTED FROM USING WYE AT WADING

RIVER.

 

GENERAL ORDER #401BC, EFFECTIVE 9/15/35:

BRANCH BETWEEN WEST HEMPSTEAD STATION AND “MT” (MINEOLA) REDESIGNATED SIDING.

 

GENERAL ORDER #1006C, EFFECTIVE 3/29/39:

SINGLE TRACK FROM A POINT 1,550’ EAST OF EAST LEG OF WYE, PORT

JEFFERSON STATION TO WADING RIVER STATION OUT OF SERVICE.

(Last revenue train was on 10/9/38.  DK)

 

GENERAL ORDER #1002B/1013C, EFFECTIVE 5/3/39: 

SAG HARBOR BRANCH OUT OF SERVICE:  5/3/39

 

ETT #22, EFFECTIVE 6/21/53:

“NORTH SIDE BRANCH” BECOMES “PORT WASHINGTON BRANCH”

 

GENERAL ORDER #216, EFFECTIVE 10/3/55:

ROCKAWAY BEACH BRANCH OUT OF SERVICE SOUTH OF OZONE PARK

AND WEST (GEOGRAPHICALLY) OF FAR ROCKAWAY.

 

GENERAL ORDER #1-21, EFFECTIVE 12/27/66:

LEAD TRACK FROM EAST END OF JERICHO TURNPIKE OVERGRADE BRIDGE

TO CREEDMOOR STATE HOSPITAL, OUT OF SERVICE.

 

GENERAL ORDER #119, EFFECTIVE 10/1/73:

HAND-OPERATED ELECTRIC LOCKED SWITCH IN NO. 1 TRACK LOCA-TED 1,800 FEET EAST OF FLORAL PARK LEADING TO CREEDMOOR LEAD TRACK REMOVED FROM SERVICE.

 

GENERAL ORDER #GN1-48, EFFECTIVE 2/15/83:

TURNTABLE TRACK AT OYSTER BAY OUT OF SERVICE.

 

MISCELLANEOUS LIRR TRIVIA AND DATA:

 

Veteran LIRR engineer Ben Baptist started out as a fireman with the New York Central Railroad and was the fireman of record aboard the famous NYC 4-4-0 locomotive #999 pulling the “Empire State Express” between New York and Chicago’s Columbian Exposition in 1893, which, at one point in the trip exceeded a speed of 100 miles-per-hour.  #999 was later placed on display at the 1939-40 New York World’s Fair in Flushing Meadows.  Ben Baptist lived into his 90s.

 

 

After the Jamaica Bay trestle fire of May 7-8, 1950, all trains to Rockaway Park via Valley Stream and Far Rockaway were considered as operating along the Far Rockaway branch. (per Art Huneke)

 

 

Thomas Goodfellow was named General Manager of the LIRR in 1954 and became president of the LIRR from January 1, 1956 until May 28, 1967 (per Art Huneke and Dave Morrison)

 

 

**Fairbanks-Morse C-liner #2404 had yellow lettering in the early 1960s. It was the only LIRR diesel so lettered. When I was going to HS in the early 60's, I frequently saw this engine passing by “WIN.” It was kind of unique.    (Dick Makse)

 

 

A round sign displaying the letter “B” was hung near the motorman’s window of an MU car to denote a train bound for Brooklyn (Flatbush Avenue) that would NOT be making a stop at Jamaica.  A similar sign displaying “NY” meant the train was bound for Penn Station and would NOT be making a stop at Jamaica.  (per Mark Smith, LIRR engineer, retired.)

 

 

Leased PRR engines were brought to Long Island by car float at Bay Ridge.  Their pilots were removed in the process.  This had to be done when engines were loaded onto car floats because the weight of the engine would depress the car float when being moved onto the pier.  (per Ron Zinn)

 

 

SECONDARY TRACK----A designated track upon which trains and engines may be operated without timetable authority, train orders or block signals, subject to prescribed signals and rules and special instructions. (from Rules of the Operating Department 1982 Definitions, courtesy of J. J. Earl)

 

 

Renaming of Secondary Tracks:

 

While the Central Extension appears in the station pages (of employee timetables), from at least 1936 on, the “branch” was classified as a siding, meaning restricted speed. Since the shuttles had no timetable authority (you need to have main track for that), I have to assume that the freights working cleared the “main” when the shuttle was operating. Note that the Central Extension was largely double track so there were many crossovers and turnouts.

 

In 1946, (probably also in 45, timetable for which I am missing), the Central Extension was gone from the station pages and the only reference was to a siding in SI 2207 which stipulated that the track extended from Garden to Meadowbrook Hospital. In 1947, in a couple of places in the Special Instructions,  was referred to as the Meadowbrook Hospital Siding.  (Richard F. Makse)

 

G.O. #1208 eff. 08/25/47 (ETT #12) changes the name of the Meadowbrook Hospital Siding to the Central Extension and states it will be operated as a secondary track between east of GARDEN to west of Mitchel Field. (Art Huneke data)

 

In the special instructions for Timetable #14 (June 13, 1948) and under Secondary Tracks of No Assigned Direction, Garden to Mitchel Field is called Central Extension. (Jeffrey Erlitz)

 

ETT #15, eff. 09/12/48 shows Garden-Mitchel Field Secondary Track.

(Art Huneke data)

 

Other than temporary block stations during the Vanderbilt Cup races, I don’t believe the line ever had any signaling. Both Clinton Road and Salisbury Plains did have ticket offices for a short period of time but likely there were no signals since the shuttles were run by the same crew.  (Richard F. Makse)