OAKDALE
                       
    

 

 


Oakdale Station c.1900 postcard Archive: Dave Morrison Note: Carriage stables at left.
 

CLUB HOUSE: SOUTH SIDE R.R. DEPOT. WEST OF OAKDALE. BUILT: 1869 TO SERVICE SOUTH SIDE SPORTSMEN’S ASSN. (LOCATED BETWEEN TODAY’S PRESENT M.P.45 AND M.P.46 AT BAYARD CUTTING ARBORETUM), CLOSED: 7/17/1884. (Date as per Geo. L. Weeks, Jr. in his book: Isle of Shells) 
 

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South Side Rail Road Club House c.1878 View East
Photo: George Brainard Archive: East Islip Historical Society

 

SSRR's Club House station, which was located just east of the Montauk Highway overpass west of Oakdale, across from the Connetquot Park which was the former location of the South Side Sportsmen's Club (hence "Club House" station).

The view is looking east at SSRR MP45 (milepost). The Bayard Cutting Arboretum today would be at the right. When the LIRR took over the SSRR, they had to reset the mileposts, hence the slight variation in MP locations.
OAKDALE: SOUTH SIDE R. R. DEPOT BUILT: 1868. RAZED: 1890 
2ND DEPOT OPENED: 12/1890 FUNDED BY THE VANDERBILTS DUE TO THE PROXIMITY OF THEIR ESTATE AND THEIR NEED FOR A REPLACEMENT OF THE WOODEN EYE-SORE S.S.R.R. DEPOT ON SITE. ALL-BRICK STRUCTURE WITH HARDWOOD PANELING INSIDE. 
DEPOT HAD PORTE COCHERE AT REAR. AGENCY CLOSED: ?
 

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 South Side Rail Road (SSRR) - Oakdale Station- 1878 (Brainard-Keller)

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Oakdale Emery Map 1902 Archive: Dave Keller

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Oakdale Emery Map 1914 Archive: Dave Keller

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Oakdale Emery Map MP45-46 5/1958
Archive: Dave Keller

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Oakdale Emery Map MP46-47 5/1958
Archive: Dave Keller

Oakdale-West Sayville Emery Map MP47-48
5/1958 Archive: Dave Keller

West Sayville-Sayville Emery Map MP48-49  5/1958
Archive: Dave Keller

Oakdale Frederic G. Bourne windmill
The Field Illustrated 4/1919


CR4 -1913 Bourne Siding Archive: Dave Keller
 


The Bourne Windmill, Oakdale, New York was an American farm design tower windmill, built in 1911 as part of a farm in Oakdale, New York. Photo/Info: Wiki

Oakdale-West Sayville Emery inset at MP48
Note: This siding in prior to 1903 and out by 1925

The siding was installed to deliver coal to the coaling facility.  It was probably extended sometime later to access the "huge hay barn" for the dairy.  The 1913 CR4 (above left) indicates a CLEAR length of 770 feet.  The 1919 CR4 indicates a CLEAR length of 810 feet.  The 1903 CR4 doesn't indicate any clear lengths, so it's possible the siding was installed for coal delivery in 1903 or earlier with a clear length of 770 feet, or less,  and was later extended to the longer length. Info: Dave Keller
 

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Oakdale Station view E 1904 
Archive: Dave Morrison
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Oakdale Station view E c.1910 postcard 
Archive: Dave Morrison

Westbound in this image is an American (4-4-0) class D56 locomotive.  These early 8-wheeled passenger locomotives were in abundance on the LIRR and were the mainstay of passenger service along with various camelback locomotives. 

 Both style locomotives were replaced by the advent of the new Pennsy-built class G5s (4-6-0) locomotives which were larger, faster and stronger and which began to appear in LIRR service starting in the early 1920s.  When all the G5s locomotives were in use on the LIRR, the D56 class (and various camelbacks) were retired.  Note the Dietz kerosene platform lamps and wooden station platform.  By 1918, electric platform lights had replaced these oil lamps.  

You may also just be able to make out the station sign in front of the ticket bay.  It's the early 1900s-style with the station name in the center and each terminus destination on either side of the name.  In this case it would read "LI City ___ miles" on the right side of the sign and "Montauk ___ miles" on the left side of the sign.  Info: Dave Keller
 

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Oakdale Station  LIRR valuation photo View W 5/13/18 Archive: Dave Morrison
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Oakdale Station  1925 Archive: Dave Morrison
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RS3 #1553 Patchogue - Babylon Scoot crossing Connetquot River westbound  view S 1968
J. P. Krzenski photo, Dave Keller archive
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Oakdale Station waiting room
9/02/2013 Photo: Derek Stadler
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Oakdale Station interior
9/02/2013 Photo: Dave Morrison
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Oakdale Station LIRR Dowling College Sign 2016

Oakdale Station display case 7/22/2021
Photo: Dave Morrison

Oakdale Station ticketing 7/22/2021
Photo: Dave Morrison

Oakdale Station LIRR Amity Education Group Sign
View E 7/22/2021  Photo: Dave Morrison

Oakdale Station view S 7/22/2021
Photo: Dave Morrison

Oakdale Station view W 7/22/2021
Photo: Dave Morrison
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Oakdale Station view NW 10/2016
Photo: Dave Morrison

Oakdale Station memorial View S  7/22/2021
Photo: Dave Morrison

Oakdale Station - Norman Demott Park - View NW
 7/22/2021 Photo: Dave Morrison
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Oakdale Station entrance - Trackside bench
10/2016 Photo: Dave Morrison

Corporal Francis V. Todarello US Army
1947-1968 Kiwanis Club plaque 5/25/1998 dedicated.
Photo: Dave Morrison 

Oakdale Station west end fireplace 2021
Photo: Charlie Garbowski Archive: Dave Morrison
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Oakdale Station 11/26/2008 
Photo: Mike McDermet
   
Oakdale Station westbound platform View NW 7/22/2021 Photo: Dave Morrison

LIRR DM30AC #500 eastbound takes the S462 Signal
just east of Oakdale. The Montauk Highway (Rte 27) overpass can be seen in the distance. 6/2022
Photo/Archive: Benjamin Lederer
OAKDALE FREIGHT HOUSE

Oakdale Freight House PRR #732 view W 1941 
Archive: Dave Keller
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Oakdale freight house minus platform view W 1971 
Archive: Dave Keller
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Oakdale Freight House 06/28/07 Photo: Mike McDermet
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LIRR map Oakdale 1966
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Oakdale freight house view W 10/2016
Photo: Dave Morrison
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Oakdale freight house view E 10/2016
Photo: Dave Morrison
OAKDALE STATION - FIRST LIRR STATION WEDDING CEREMONY 1995
Courtesy: Dave Morrison

On December 10, 1995, the Oakdale Station was the site of the first wedding ceremony held in an LIRR station, when Charlotte Hebert and Edward Wintraecken exchanged vows in front of the ticket office's fireplace. The groom, a train enthusiast, sells and custom paints HO cars and engines. Branch Line Manager Dave Morrison presented the couple with a commemorative program of their wedding that included a drawing and history of the station.

 

Wedding Along the Track Feb 1995.jpg (62761 bytes) Wedding 10 Dec 1994 fireplace pose.jpg (78101 bytes)

 

Wedding 10 Dec 1994 outdoor pose.jpg (62901 bytes)

 

Push for Oakdale train station to be a national landmark
Sam Desmond - The Long Island ADVANCE: Wednesday, December 1, 2021

Built in 1895 under the auspices of William K. Vanderbilt, the Oakdale train station was meant to receive the well-heeled and well-connected pinnacle members of New York society, the kind that Wharton gossiped about.

When Dave Morrison, a train connoisseur who retired from the Long Island Rail Road, was researching for his book on trains, he wondered if Oakdale train station, with its lavish history and enduring beauty, was landmarked.

In speaking with Maryann Almes, the president of Oakdale Historical Society, it was determined that while the Oakdale train station and freight station (both of which are in current use) were registered as historical sites with the Town of Islip, neither had been designated official landmarks, a process that requires the owner of a site to apply.

Currently, there are six LIRR train stations that are nationally landmarked:  Sea Cliff, Oyster Bay, Farmingdale, East Hampton, St. James and Southampton, the majority of which are still used in everyday commuter life.

Not wanting Oakdale train station to become another casualty of railroad modernization, like the Mineola tower or the third-oldest railroad station in East Williston that was demolished unceremoniously to make way for new tracks, Almes sought help from Sarah Kautz, Preservation Long Island, who advised her to reach out to local elected officials to help with the process.

Assemblyman Jarett Gandolfo (R-7th District) and Legis. Anthony Piccirillo (R-8th District), the latter of which has been instrumental in advocating for another Oakdale historical site, the Idle Hour Mansion, were enthusiastic to help.

“Assemblyman Gandolfo was eager to start the ball rolling and within days of my Facebook post about designating Oakdale train station a historical landmark, was coordinating to set up a Zoom call with the appropriate LIRR representatives who could make the application,” said Almes.

“Like many of our communities on the South Shore, Oakdale has a rich and fascinating history that must be preserved. When the Oakdale Historical Society approached me about seeking historical designation for the train station, I thought it was a great initiative to work together on. I’ve had preliminary discussions with the State Historic Preservation Office and representatives from the LIRR, and my office will continue working with the Historical Society to get this done,” said Gandolfo.

The Oakdale train station, which boasts two period fireplaces, could be replaced with a modern monstrosity like the stone unit that replaced an invaluable hearth built in 1898 in Garden City.

“These [Oakdale station fireplaces] were built with the finest of people in mind to gaze upon them,” said Almes. “We can’t let it be taken away for some utilitarian purpose.”

In a previous correspondence with the LIRR, Almes said that while they recognize the historic significance of the Oakdale train station, they did not desire to have it landmarked.

Since that conversation, Almes and the Historical Society has written a letter of intent to the National Trust for Historic Preservation to be included in their annual list of “America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places.”

Over 300 sites have been put on this list since 1988 with less than 5 percent being lost to new construction or demolition.

In the late 19th century, Oakdale, Sayville and Bayport were at the heart of the sportsmen’s clubs of the era, with expansive and fruitful hunting and fishing that can be seen today preserved in our town and county parks.

When the wealthy elite of New York City built their awe-inspiring mansions, their families and friends could visit and escape the summer heat of Gotham.

The original Oakdale train station was a dilapidated structure and William K. Vanderbilt did not find it fitting for his high society guests to be received in.

Thus, it was transformed into a 1 ½ brick building with Richardsonian arches on the east side, English-style triple casement windows, and a porte-cochere so guests could be received in the appropriate carriage style.

After her wedding of the century, the newly betrothed couple Consuelo Vanderbilt and the Duke of Marlborough came out to Long via train and arrived at the Oakdale train station.

In 1994, a wedding, the only wedding to ever take place in a LIRR station, was held at Oakdale train station.

“Preserving our history on Long Island is almost a right of passage. We must make efforts to save and preserve the past so future generations can enjoy it and learn from it as much as we have,” said Piccirillo.