Long Island Rail Road Double-deckers
 
 


LIRR's double-deck M.U.'s featured
a unique up-down seating configuration.

Classic Trains collection


Modeling M-70 Decals

Long Island Rail Road M-70 Double Deckers, HO (#100)
Instructions, Oct. 31, 2005
William Mosteller, P. O. Box 994, Herndon, VA 20172
www.greatdecals.com



 

Their size and length were overwhelming. The big balloon roof with headlights and portholes at each end was always a pleasant sight. The two rows of paired windows staggered along the car side always seemed to disappear in the distance. With illuminated numberboards in the headlight housings — no other Long Island Rail Road electric multiple-unit car had this
feature — you always knew which car you were looking at.

"And I appreciated the little touches, like the equipment trust plate in the upper corner of each car and the upper-level window guard bars to prevent passengers from placing their arms outside the car. That’s how I remember Long Island’s double-deckers."

So begins author Michael Boland’s fond remembrance of LIRR’s unique fleet of commuter cars in the Spring 2003 issue of Classic Trains.


#1301 at Jamaica
P1301-Belmont Raceway.jpg (246813 bytes)
#1301 at Belmont Raceway

#1313 at Babylon

#1313 at Jamaica
lirr1345joesaullo.jpg (49530 bytes)
#1345 Bliss 1971 Photo: Joe Saullo
Jamaica_1971012RGlueck.jpg (58471 bytes)
Jamaica 1971 view east end of the platform. The double decker was on the west end. 
Photo: Richard Glueck
RockvilleCentre_c.1950.jpg (162017 bytes)
Rockville Centre :  The double decker is in Tuscan Red with Dulux lettering.  The cars in the distant background look like late 1940s.  Tichy color scheme began in November, 1949 and took several years for all the cars to be repainted.  

Since the transmission poles were on the north side at RVC and as they are visible in the photo, then we are looking northeast and the train is a westbound, early-morning train.  

That means that the temporary tracks, which were south of the original ROW, are NOT those tracks in the photo and the elevated camera angle was taken from somewhere else.  If these WERE the temporary tracks, then there would be signs of construction across the street where the original ROW would have been in the process of being torn up.  

This is not the case, so this is the original ROW and construction has not yet begun. . . . .. That would make the photo no later than the Winter of 1948-49 and the elimination construction has not yet begun. Al so, everyone is bundled up for the winter chill

The station and tracks were placed out of service in April, 1949 and temporary tracks and station facilities placed in service.  The elevated tracks and station were placed in service in July, 1950.
Archive: Jim Gillin Photo: LIRR Research: Dave Keller


 

Road No.

Class Type

Length

Air-cond.

Built

Notes

 

200

T62

trailer

72’ 0”

no

1932

1, 8


#200 at Jamaica

lirr200riverhead08-26-07.jpg (38936 bytes)
#200 Riverhead 08/26/2007

201

T70

trailer

80’ 8-34”

no

1937

2


#201 at Jamaica

202-205

T70A

trailer

80’ 8-34”

yes

1947

3, 6

 

1287-1322

MP70B

trailer

80’ 8-34”

yes

1948

4, 5


  Union Hall  Street  7/12/71  #1296

1323-1336

MP70B

trailer

80’ 8-34”

yes

1949

5


#1326 at Babylon

lirr1346WestHempstead.jpg (56492 bytes)
#1346 at West Hempstead

1341-1346

MP70A

trailer

80’ 8-34”

yes

1947

6

ddmotor.jpg (51860 bytes)

1347

MP70

trailer

80’ 8-34”

no

1937

7

 
 
Notes to table:*
1. Mid-train trailer; no motors or controls. Only surviving LIRR double-decker; preserved at
Railroad Museum of Long Island.
2. Controls removed 1958.
3. Delivered without motors due to Westinghouse strike; motors added 1947-48; renumbered 1337-1340; re-classed MP70A.
4. Seven cars (1287-1289, 1291, 1334-1336) converted to motorized trailers in late 1950's, re-classed MP70BT.
5. Ten cars (1301-1307, 1309, 1311, 1312) rebuilt in 1967 with sealed  windows and improved air-conditioning.
6. Five cars (1337, 1338, 1340, 1341, 1345) converted to motors in 1958; re-classed MP70AT.
7. Controls and motors removed 1958, re-classed T70.
8. The first double decker car built, lacking both motors and controls, but was also the FIRST ALL ALUMINUM railroad car
    produced.  A major historical  milestone.
(Dave Keller)        *Classic Trains Information