LIRR Tenders

LIRR #39 G5s with tender lettering "LONG ISLAND" in Penn Roman style gold lettering at Oyster Bay  Archive: Art Huneke 

TENDERS: 

"Lines West" Tenders on H10s Locomotives: 

All nineteen H10s locomotives that came to the LIRR from the Pennsy were "Lines West" engines. They all carried high numbers on the Pennsy as did all "Lines West" engines: in the 7000-8000 range. The smaller tenders that some of the pre-stokered engines hauled were also "Lines West." (Data courtesy of Ron Zinn)

9000 gallon Class 90P70 tender was originally built with the Pennsy I1 class decapods. Over a hundred of these tenders were transferred to K4 engines during the 1930's when the I1's received larger ones. Virtually all K4's that ran on LI from the late thirties until the arrival of the stoker fired engines in early 1944 had these tenders. What is interesting is that these tenders did show up from time to time on E6's, K2's and even H9's. (Data courtesy of Ron Zinn)

LIRR TENDERS FOR CLASS G5s LOCOMOTIVES
(Data and Photos Courtesy of Ron Zinn)

The first four LI G5's 20-23 delivered in 1924, came with these tenders, class 70P82.
The next five G5's 24-28 delivered in 1925, came with these tenders, class 70P82a. These tenders remained in service with various G5's throughout most of the steam era on Long Island.

Note: Futura lettering style used briefly on locomotive tenders in 1940-41 in this photo left. Research: Dave Keller
   LIRR Tender Class 70.P.82a Behind G5s 25  -Oyster Bay - 1940 (T. Sommer - Keller).jpg (78746 bytes)
LIRR tender Class: 70.P.82a behind  G5s #25 at Oyster Bay 1940 with Penn Roman style lettering. (T. Sommer-Keller)  Research: Dave Kelller  

The next ten G5's 29-38 delivered in 1928, came with these tenders, class 110P82a.  These tenders were specifically designed by William Kiesel of the Pennsy for the Long Island G5's.  They were designed for hand firing and no Pennsy G5's ever had them. 

In addition, four of these tenders had been built by Baldwin Locomotive Works to Kiesel's drawings in 1926 for the Long Island Rail Road.  The only difference between those four and the ten 1928 tenders was the number of internal braces. 

Those four tenders replaced the four 70P82 tenders delivered in 1924 with the first four G5's.  The 70P82 tenders were then coupled to camelbacks. Info: Ron Zinn

Note: This would explain why the Sunrise Special images all showed G5s #21 pulling this type tender c. 1927, as #21 was one of the first four G5's delivered in 1924. Info: Dave Keller

The last twelve G5's 39-50, delivered in 1929-30, came with these tenders, also class 110P82a.  You can see the difference between these and the previous 110P82a tenders.  Notice the line of rivets near the top below the equipment trust plate and the longer collar at the top of the coal space.  This is because these twelve tenders were originally designed for Pennsy M1 mountain type engines. 

In 1929 the Pennsy had these tenders converted and sold them to the Long Island for use on the final twelve G5's.  The conversion involved removing the inner sloped sides of the coal space.  These were originally sloped because these tenders were built for stoker firing, hence the line of rivets at the top.  The coal space was shortened, a 45 degree slope sheet put in and the deck height was raised to match the G5 firing deck. 

The Pennsy had started building long distance tenders for the M1's, making these tenders available for the Long Island.

LIRR TENDERS FOR CLASS H10s LOCOMOTIVES
(Data and Photos Courtesy of Ron Zinn)

When the H-10's arrived on Long Island in 1928-29, they came from PRR Lines West.  Some of them were equipped with these tenders which were set up for hand firing.  This particular tender had a classification plate which indicated that it was class 80P79. Some Pennsy Lines West K3 passenger engines were equipped with this type of tender which probably accounts for the 80P79 passenger tender classification.

Some of the H-10's were equipped with these tenders which were also a Lines West design. I'm not sure, but these tenders may have been class 70F66e. These were also set up for hand firing.

When the Long Island H-10's were equipped with stokers in 1945-46, they received these tenders which were class 80F81a.  As you can see this tender has a brakeman's doghouse.

The first H-10 to be stokered may have been the 105 in June of 1945.  The 113 was still hand fired as late as 1947.  None of these tenders had brakeman's doghouses when they first appeared on the LIRR.  This photo dates from 1949 so I would say that these doghouses, as they were called, were added during the late 1940's.  I can't say which engines had them because tenders were always being switched around.  Photographic evidence would seem to indicate that most, if not all of these tenders received brakeman's doghouses.  Stokering had nothing to do with the addition of the "doghouses."  Apparently it was decided that the brakeman's perch was a beneficial addition.

LIRR Tender Class 110.P.82a Behind G5s Locomotive - Oyster Bay - 1940 (T. Sommer-Keller).jpg (75654 bytes)
LIRR Tender Class 110.P.82a behind G5s locomotive at Oyster Bay 1940 (T. Sommer-Keller)

G5s-30-Tender-Engine-Wiper-MPShops-10-42_Zinn.jpg (124104 bytes)
LIRR G5s #30 tender with engine wipers at Morris Park Shops 10/1942 Archive: Ron Zinn

G5s-21-Tender-Taking on Water-Ronkonkoma-8-1947_Keller.jpg (172738 bytes)
G5s #21 tender taking on water at Ronkonkoma 8/1947
Archive: Dave Keller
G5s-34-MPShops-c.1935-Footboards-on-psgr-tender_Zinn.jpg (82421 bytes)
G5s #34 Morris Park Shops c.1935 Footboards on passenger tender Archive: Ron Zinn

Tender-G5s-39-Taking-Water-Ronkonkoma-6-5-55_Keller.jpg (156028 bytes)
GG5s LIRR #39 tender taking on water Ronkonkoma 06/05/1955 Archive: Dave Keller

 

Note: Female engine wipers at Morris Park Shops having some fun with the hostler, Jim Calisto, of G5s #30 as they head out to their work assignments.  These women temporarily replaced the men who were drafted into the military for wartime service. Their job was to wipe off the oil and grease from the locomotives that came into the shops. 

The woman in the front left with the shiny buttons up her front is definitely NOT a trainman or conductor. She's Rose Penna who was 20 years old at the time. The idea that women were working in what were traditionally men's jobs was considered newsworthy back then. Pictures of female engine wipers on the LIRR appeared in various newspapers and magazines. Rose Penna appeared in many of these photos, some close-ups in which she was identified in the captions.

She was the one who always wore some sort of cap and a jacket. The LIRR started hiring women as engine wipers in September 1942. The women in this photo were among the first to be hired. The LIRR did hire Female trainmen but probably starting in 1943. According to Ron Ziel they were called "wheels". Info: Ron Zinn

LIRR Tender Class 60.P.80 No. 136 Behind G53 No. 144 in Derailment near Northport - c. 1945 (Keller).jpg (119159 bytes)
LIRR Tender No. 136 Class: 60.P.80 behind G53 #144 in derailment near Northport c.1945 Archive: Dave Keller
LIRR Tender Class 60.P.80 No. 136-Closeup of Tender Plate - c. 1945 (Keller).jpg (129109 bytes)
LIRR Tender No. 136 Class: 60.P.80 
 Close-up of Tender Plate c.1945 Archive: Dave Keller
LIRR Tender Class 70.P.82a Behind G5s 25  -Oyster Bay - 1940 (T. Sommer - Keller).jpg (78746 bytes)
LIRR tender Class: 70.P.82a behind  G5s #25 at Oyster Bay 1940 with Penn Roman style lettering. (T. Sommer-Keller)  Research: Dave Keller
LIRR Tender Class 80.P.81 No. 107 Taking Water Behind H10s No. 105-Film Crew - Oyster Bay - 09-06-37 (T. Sommer-Keller).jpg (138156 bytes)
LIRR Tender No.107 Class 80.P.81 taking water behind LIRR H10s #105 during filming of Floyd Gibbons' "True Adventure Stories" at Oyster Bay 09/06/37.  The location represented Wellington, KS on the AT&SF. AT&SF-style crossing signs were erected in the yard for additional filming sequences.  (Ted Sommer photo - Dave Keller archive and data)
LIRR Tender Class 80.P.81 No. 107 Behind H10s No. 105-(Closeup of Tender Plate) - 09-06-37 (T. Sommer-Keller).jpg (98986 bytes)
LIRR Tender No.107 Class 80.P.81 close-up of Tender Plate 09/06/37 (T. Sommer-Keller)

Class 80.P.81 LIRR passenger  tender
Water gallon capacity: 81,000 coal lbs. capy: 34350 
Weight empty: 76700 weight loaded: 178550

 

LIRR Tender Class 80.P.81 No. 107 Behind H10s No. 105-(Closeup of Tender Plate at Coupler) - 09-06-37 (T. Sommer-Keller).jpg (130317 bytes)
LIRR Tender Class 80.P.81 No. 107 behind H10s #105 close-up of  Tender Plate at coupler 9/06/37
(T. Sommer-Keller)