THE LIRR "EXTRA" LIST

    

Here's the List!

 

LIRR FARM PRODUCTS SHIPPED BY RAIL 7/04/2017
NORMAN KOHL PHOTOS - 7/03/2017
FLAG STOP SIGNAL STATIONS  5/18/2017
GEORGE L. WYBENGA (1937-2016)  3/01/2017
WESTBROOK FARMS 2/01/17
LIRR ENGINE DESIGNATIONS  01/22/17
CROSSING SAFETY POSTERS 11/12/16
LIRR REPRODUCTION ITEMS - CATALOGUE OF MEMORABILIA 10/01/16
LIRR PHOTOGRAPHERS 9/30/16
ADELPHI CLASSROOM ON WHEELS 9/15/16
WEEKEND CHIEF - BAR MENU  & DESIGNATION 8/18/16
CAMP BLACK 1898  7/31/16
1910 PENNSYLVANIA STATION AND TUNNELS INSPECTION 6/24/16
THE STEINWAY LINES  4/23/16

OIL ELECTRIC BOXCABS 1/29/16
ROW POWER LINES 1/16/16
CHARLES W. HOPPE 12/26/15
CROSS BAY UNION FREIGHT TUNNEL1936 PORT AUTHORITY STUDY 10/14/15
DE30 #418 NOSE DETAILS 10/13/15
NEW SIGNALS and SPEED CONTROL - Railway Age 1952 10/06/15

G5s #39 RESTORATION ARTICLE by John Kilbride 6/21/15
BICENTENNIAL HERITAGE CARS 4/25/15
LIRR MARITIME ROSTER 1/17/2015
LIST OF PRESIDENTS AND TRUSTEES OF THE LONG ISLAND RAIL ROAD 9/14/14
LIRR MONOGRAM DATA SHEET 8/15/14
AAR INSPECTION CONSIST 8/15/14
READING A TRAIN ORDER FORM 31 12/01/13
STA
TION NUMBERS 7/25/13
SWITCHING ROSLYN 12/02/12
CHAINING MEASURING EXPLAINED 10/10/11
LIRR ELECTRIFIED ROUTES
LIRR NAMED TRAINS
LIRR ARCHIVE LOCATIONS
LIE CONSTRUCTION BEGINS QUEENS 1954 at 57th Ave LIRR
LESTER C. TICHY, Architect 1905 – 1981  8/12/10
LIRR STATIONS: Closed/Reopened/Remove
d/Replaced
HUNTINGTON STATION LOCATION
LIRR TRAIN NUMBERS
SILL'S FARM, GREENPORT
NEW YORK - EAST RIVER - NEWTOWN CREEK - DUTCH KILLS - Bridge Closure 
LIRR EMPLOYEE RECORDS
LIRR MILEPOST CALCULATIONS 
AGENT, AGENCY, & TICKET CLERK 
TRACTION BLVD
STEAM ENGINE SPEEDS
BAY RIDGE YARD WAS A LIRR SWITCH JOB
FARMINGDALE AGRICULTURAL ROOTS PHOTO
CONTINENTAL BAKING COMPANY - HISTORY OF JAMAICA LIRR SPOT #16
NEW GONDOLA ORDER 2009
LIRR G5s # 35, #39, #50 FINAL RUNs "Steam Specials" October 1955
END OF STEAM CEREMONY DEFINITIVE LIST October 8th, 1955
GE TURBINES
SUNRISE HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION
W SIGNS ARE CALLED WHISTLE POSTS
LIRR EAST - WEST RULES 
EARLY DIESELS OF THE SUNRISE TRAIL
BARNEY or MULE at SUNNYSIDE YARD, LI CITY SHOPS

LIRR FARM PRODUCTS SHIPPED BY RAIL

RAILROADING FARM WAGONS

LIRR-produce-by-rail_Harpers_1-31-1885.jpg (392930 bytes)The completion of the Pacific railways practically brought the vast grain fields and metal veins of the far west from one to two thousand miles nearer New York, according to the extent of time annihilated. This thought occurred to Superintendent Rarton of the Long Island Railway, as he saw the farmers driving their produce from the eastern end of the island. The horses seemed overworked, and a journey of 60 miles could not be easily made in less than 8 hours. The philosophic superintendent conceived a scheme which included both relief to the farmers and profit for the railway. He proposed to the farmers that he should run a special train from the eastern to the western terminus of the road, and take their loaded wagons and animals on board. The proposition provoked laughter. Then the philosopher proposed that the farmers should make several train trips free of expense. One day, a short time since, a special train stopped at Albertson and found ten farmers and their loads in waiting. The wagons were put on flat cars, and the horses in box cars, arranged with some reference to their comfort. The train made a run of sixty miles in an hour and a half. The farmers arrived at the market with their horses fresh, and themselves in a good frame of mind, ready to do a better days work than they could have done otherwise. When they returned home, they told the story to all their neighbors. As a result, the eastern end of the island was elated. On the second trial trip, although it rained dismally, twenty-three loads of produce were in waiting, and a great many people witnessed the transfer, which occupied one hour’s time. 

LIRR-produce-wagons-by-rail_Harpers_1-31-1885.jpg (90697 bytes)Three special trains per week have been put on the road, leaving the eastern terminus at 3:30 am and arriving at the ferry at five o’clock. Some thirty farmers are already patronizing the line, paying four dollars each for one round trip. The eastern end of the island is thus brought as near New York for the vegetable and produce farmers as the western end. Land can be had on the east end at twenty-five dollars per acre, and it is believed being so near New York, the sparsely settled portions will soon become populated. Meanwhile, great indignation prevails among the produce raisers near New York, who threatened to derail the special train. The keepers of the saloons along the old route of the farmers are especially indignant. 

 

Article: January 31, 1885 Harper's Magazine,  page 78. Collection: Dave Morrison

NORMAN KOHL PHOTOS

lirr113_2-8-0 Class H10s_meet_lirr38-G5s_Smithtown_viewE_1951_Norman-Kohl.jpg (138014 bytes)Norman Kohl, LIRR railfan and photographer, was "famous" for creating "staged" photos of LIRR steam locomotives high-balling down the tracks with large plumes of smoking coming from the stack. 

Although, creating excessive smoke was against LIRR Operating Rules, Norman was friendly with several engineers. He would tell them where he would be positioned to take a photograph. When the engineer got to that location, the engineer would blast some sand into the flues (or where-ever) and create the glorious heavy smoke. Because of Norman, there are many great action photos of LIRR steam locomotives in existence today. That is just my take on Norman. Info: Dave Morrison

 

LIRR H10s #113  meet with LIRR G5s #38 - Smithtown view E - 1951 Photo: Norman Kohl

Norman-Kohl_age67_Locust-Valley_7-79_TerryGuy.jpg (101359 bytes)In Steel Rails to the Sunrise, the pictorial history of the Long Island Rail Road by Ron Ziel and George H. Foster, Norman Kohl is described as "the unofficial photographer of the Oyster Bay branch." Norman, a fellow resident of Glen Head, NY, was my railfan mentor, and I went out train chasing with him many times. For all that, this is the only picture I ever got of him, alongside a local freight heading railroad west on the branch after switching the lumberyard spur at Locust Valley. Norman thought he'd ruined my picture by being in it. Terry Guy

Norman Kohl, age 67, at Locust Valley 7/1979 Photo/Archive: Terry Guy

lirr49_Locust-Valley_1940s_Kohl-Morrison.jpg (64759 bytes)
LIRR #49 Locust Valley c.1940s (Kohl-Morrison)
lirr48_Glen-Head_1942_Kohl-Morrison.jpg (110756 bytes)
LIRR #48 Glen Head 1942 (Kohl-Morrison)

LIRR24_Glen-Head_1940s_Norman-Kohl.jpg (89676 bytes)
LIRR #24 Glen Head c1940s Norman Kohl

Norman-Kohl_Glen-Cove-Station_c.1958_Morrison.jpg (112018 bytes)
Norman Kohl at Glen Cove Station c.1958 
Archive: Dave Morrison

Norman-Kohl_ex-lumber-siding-turnout_Glen-Cove_c.1958_Morrison.jpg (182768 bytes)
Norman Kohl at ex-lumber siding turnout Glen Cove c.1958 
Archive: Dave Morrison

G5s-28_Oyster-Bay-yard_viewE_1951_Kohl_SUNY-Stony-Brook28.jpg (66407 bytes)
G5s #28 Oyster Bay yard view E 1951 
Photo: Kohl Archive: SUNY Stony Brook
AlcoRS1_461-lirrG5_01-23-55_Obay_Kohl.jpg (47343 bytes)
Alco RS1 #461, LIRR G5 1/23/1955 at Oyster Bay turntable  
Photo: Norman Kohl
KingsParkwestofStationlirr113_1955NormanEKohl.jpg (67470 bytes)
LIRR H10s #113 west of Kings Park Station 1955
Photo: Norman Kohl

 

FLAG STOP SIGNAL STATIONS

Pinelawn - Flag Stop Signal 1908 - Archive: Art Huneke

Station stops with minimal ridership or barely ANY ridership were sometimes designated as a signal stop or flag stop.  Timetables would have a notation next to the specific station that stops were made by signal only.  These signals as depicted in these two images would be operated manually by riders seeking to stop the approaching train.  The stirrup-style handle would be pulled down, raising the small semaphore-style blade.  Conversely, riders ON the train wishing to get off at one of these stations would notify the conductor on board the train in advance and he'd signal the engineer to make the station stop.  These signals were of much smaller construction and of slightly different blade style, so as not to be confused with block signals.  (Dave Keller data)

 

Station-Glendale-Tower 9 (GW)-View East-1906_Flag-Stop-Signals.jpg (84358 bytes)
Glendale Station - Flag Stop Signals - 1906 View E towards Tower #9 and renamed in 1907 as "GW"  Archive: Dave Keller
 IN MEMORIAM - GEORGE LODEWIJK WYBENGA  (1937-2016)

It is with great sadness that the RMLI Board of Trustees announce the passing of Trustee George L. Wybenga on October 27, 2016. George served the Board as a liaison to the Long Island Sunrise Trail Chapter - NRHS but became more then an appointed representative.

lirr39RMLI_GeorgeLWybenga_small.jpg (20161 bytes)Known for his outstanding watercolor paintings of cabooses from across North America, he generously created the image of engine #39 that we use on our museum jackets and 25th Anniversary letterhead. George designed seven of our Lionel collectible cars which began with the Wonder Bread PS-2 covered hopper and closing with our trio of G-16 50th Anniversary Commemorative Cars.

At one time George worked as a sign painter and his sign work appears all about our Museum properties. George was a good friend and mentor and he will be missed by everyone who came to know him. RMLI Postboy Winter-Spring 2017 issue

George L. Wybenga_Remembrance..jpg (81121 bytes)There will be a memorial service celebrating the life of George Lodewijk Wybenga 1937-2016. Saturday April 1, 2017 at 2:30 pm at the 
Port Jefferson Village Center - 101 East Broadway, Port Jefferson 11777
Art - Music - Remembrances - Coffee - Sweets. A gift in memory of George could be a donation to Long Island Cares or the Food Bank
for New York City in lieu of flowers.

Info/questions: (718) 902-6809 or mcdillo@gmail.com   Village Center: http://portjeff.com/village-center-2/

 

 

 

 

NO&W8360GeorgeWybenga05-09.jpg (77985 bytes)
NYO&W #8360 built 1916 renumbered  LIRR #74 
            3/1957 George L. Wybenga
5/2009

LIRR #38 at Camp Pa-Qua-Tuck, Center Moriches George L. Wybenga
lirr92printGeorgeLWybenga03-09.jpg (70912 bytes)
LIRR  #92 George L. Wybenga 03/2009
WESTBROOK FARMS - EAST ISLIP
Owners: Nicoll-Maitland-Lorillard-Cutting-Mordecai-Lindsay

Barbara Lindsey in their antique classic car c.1960 in front of 
Westbrook Farms.
.
Westbrook_Lorillard-map_1885_EastIslipHistoricalSociety.jpg (186503 bytes)
Map of Westbrook Estate property of G. L. Lorillard - 1885 View N 
Note: The  present day Sunrise Hwy (Route 27) crosses halfway up the 1 mile track.

Robert L. Maitland purchased a tract of 635 acres of land adjoining the Sportsman's Club from William Nicoll. This tract of land was known as "WestBrook". When he established his estate on this land he named it Westbrook. The 15 acre pond on the property, fed by West Brook, became known as "Maitland's Pond", and was famous for its trout - in fact, it was reported in May of 1872 that the largest recorded trout taken that season in the United States was landed on the Maitland Preserve. The curve of the LIRR tracks as it turns north to skirt the Connetquot River was called Maitland's Curve; built 1868 by the South Side Rail Road.

Robert Maitland died December 23, 1870. On June 7, 1873, a Southerner, George L. Lorillard of Tobacco fame, purchased the 635-acre tract, including the spacious mansion, 50 acres of lawn, lovely gardens, orchards and the 15-acre man-made trout pond.

Mr. Lorillard continued to improve the property, remodeling the dwelling, building cottages, two large barns, moving older outbuildings back from the main road (Montauk Highway - 27A) and erecting miles of fence. As many as 50 men were employed at one time doing this work. At this time Long Island was famous for the raising of horses and this was one of Lorillard's activities. In 1875 a large stable, capable of housing 50 horses, was constructed in ten sections forming a circle, while covering an acre of ground. The center was open for exercising the horses in rough weather.

The Lorillard Stable of racing horses represented many winners in many races but probably the most satisfying one was the race won by "Iroquois" at the English Derby held at Epson Downs... the first time an American horse won the Derby stakes.

William Bayard Cutting purchased the property after Mr. Lorillard death for $125,000 in 1884.

Thomas Mordecai (Turkey and Dairy Farm) sometime in the 1940's.  Raymond Leo Lindsey began his ownership c.1951 after his marriage to Barbara Ann Dickerson (1929-2009)

Research: East Islip Historical Society - Ray Lembo

LIRR ENGINE DESIGNATIONS

Engine designations were from the days when LIRR was a ward of the PRR, the "E" was EMD, the numbers was based on the engine's horsepower, E-10 = SW 1001, E-15 = MP-15's (both AC/DC versions), E-20 = GP38-2's, and the L1, L-2  = Alco C420's orders.  This might have been "corrupted" a bit by the MTA.

PC designated the FL-9 as EP-17e, following the PRR practice till the end of PC, as an example. 

CROSSING SAFETY POSTERS
 
Archive: Dave Morrison  
Death beckons_Warning-Flagman-on-duty-9am-4pm-only.jpg (91468 bytes)
"WARNING: FLAGMAN on DUTY 9am to 4pm ONLY"
Safety Poster-1922.jpg (123173 bytes)
Cross Crossing Cautiously Poster 1922

LIRR Bulletin June 1927-2.jpg (157742 bytes)
LIRR Bulletin June 1927

Safety-Poster-1924.jpg (182904 bytes)
"I Think I can make it!" Safety Poster 1924 

 

Safety-Poster-1926.jpg (193801 bytes)
"Be Careful!" Safety Poster 1926
LIRR-Bulletin_June-1927.jpg (193871 bytes)
"Wait Daddy! Until the train passes" LIRR Bulletin June 1927
LIRR-Bulletin-1931.jpg (298095 bytes)
LIRR Bulletin January-February 1931
RR Safety Poster-4.jpg (200274 bytes)

RR Safety Posters-3.jpg (221678 bytes)

RR Safety Posters-1.jpg (174216 bytes)

RR Safety Posters-2.jpg (171654 bytes)

Crossing-Safety-posters.jpg (164367 bytes)
Cross Crossings Cautiously c.1925
LIRR REPRODUCTION ITEMS - CATALOGUE OF MEMORABILIA
originally starting in July, 1971 Archive: Dave Morrison
LIRR Repro Items - 07-1971-1 (D. Morrison).jpg (199613 bytes) LIRR Repro Items - 07-1971-2 (D. Morrison).jpg (187298 bytes) LIRR Repro Items - 07-1971-3 (D. Morrison).jpg (173529 bytes)
LIRR Repro Items - 07-1971-4 (D. Morrison).jpg (181454 bytes) LIRR Repro Items - 07-1971-5 (D. Morrison).jpg (189097 bytes) LIRR Repro Items - 07-1971-6 (D. Morrison).jpg (180111 bytes)
LIRR Repro Items - 07-1971-7 (D. Morrison).jpg (206172 bytes)
 Re-issue and additional material starting in July, 1972  Archive: Dave Morrison
LIRR Repro Items - 07-1972-1 (D. Morrison).jpg (225543 bytes) LIRR Repro Items - 07-1972-2 (D. Morrison).jpg (204557 bytes) LIRR Repro Items - 07-1972-3 (D. Morrison).jpg (204057 bytes)
LIRR Repro Items - 07-1972-4 (D. Morrison).jpg (194302 bytes) LIRR Repro Items - 07-1972-5 (D. Morrison).jpg (209022 bytes) LIRR Repro Items - 07-1972-6 (D. Morrison).jpg (196127 bytes)
 Reproduction Timetables - Archive: Dave Keller
Note: The timetable listings below are only partial scans of each entire document for illustration purposes, except the complete PTT of 1852.

LIRR Annual Report - 06/30/1904

 


LIRR PTT Eff. 10/18/1880

LIRR Principal Express Trains Eff. 05/15/1910

LIRR ETT no.26 Eff. 05/27/1903 

LIRR ETT no.18 Eff. 11/08/1880 


The last instruction in this 1880 ETT

This sounds very much to me that mixed trains on the LIRR were quite common back then for them to stipulate this. In addition to, cutting cars in and out of a consist, cars with heavy loads, like lumber cars, when stopped suddenly, would have sufficient momentum underway to possibly crush a lighter, wooden passenger car coupled ahead of it. I'd say the ruling was more due to safety rather than convenience in cutting and handling cars. 

 


LIRR System PTT Eff. 10/1884

LIRR PTT Eff. 12-01-1852 (Keller).jpg (480797 bytes)
LIRR PTT Eff. 10/01/1852

Note:  On  the 1852 PTT (above right) the eastbound Mail and Passenger train and the westbound Freight train hit Nichols Road at the same time.  These old timetables used to indicate points of meeting / passing and were not necessarily a listed station.  While Nichols Road MAY have been a low-level platform station stop, I believe it was only an indicated meeting / passing point.  Otherwise, why is there no westbound passenger train to return passengers to this location?

The location, up until the time I left Long Island in 1988, was wooded and uninhabited with a dirt path that once crossed the tracks still visible (the remains of Foot's Crossing).  Imagine what it looked like in 1852!  No possible need for a station stop.  Nothing there.  Nobody living there.  Simply a meeting / passing point only.  Info: Dave Keller

LIRR PHOTOGRAPHERS

Thomas Bayles - LIRR Ticket clerk - Resident of Middle Island, NY. Photographed Shoreham and Miller's Place stations in 1915. Photographed Camp Upton in 1918. No other LIRR photos taken. Majority of the LIRR images in his archive (and now mine) were shot by his brother Albert in 1912-1940. Albert was a LIRR Carpenter.

Will V. Faxon, Jr. - Resident of NJ. Photographed the LIRR, BEDT, PRR, CRRNJ, NYC, Reading and others. Images in my archive from late 1940s through early 1960s. Not sure if he shot anything earlier than late 1940s.

Artthur Huneke - LIRR Block operator, retired. Resided in East Islip, NY and presently Kodak, TN. Railfan and historian. Photographed the LIRR from the late 1950s until the 1980s.

David Keller - LIRR Extra ticket clerk (1972) and LIRR Special Services Attendant (1973, 1974) before moving onto other fields. Resided in Holtsville, NY. Railfan and historian. Photographed the LIRR from 1966-1975, then again briefly in 1987 before moving to Orlando, FL. Authored two Arcadia Publishing books on the LIRR with the assistance of Steven Lynch. 

William Madden - H&M / Path signal department. Resided in Queens, and later Longwood, FL. Residing now in MD. Photographed practically every inch of the LIRR along with Jeff Erlitz in 1978-79

Richard F. Makse - LIRR Special Services Attendant and later ran that department. Photographed in 1960s-1970s

James V. Osborne - Worked for the NY Central then hired on with the LIRR as Block operator and later station agent at Southampton. Resident of Southampton - photographed 1921 (start date with LIRR)-early 1930s. Had a 50-year career with the LIRR. 

William Rugen - LIRR Roundhouse Clerk that was very knowledgeable and respected enough to be assigned to ride the cab of an E6 to Montauk, a new RS1 and the steam fan trips 1952 – 1955. Photographed the LIRR from the early 1950s -1960s.

Ted R. Sommer - LIRR Block operator - Resident of Oyster Bay. Photographed LIRR 1939-1941, then nothing. Possible casualty of WWII but unsure. Maybe just left LIRR and moved away.

George E. Votava - LIRR railfan. Grew up in the Bronx and later resided in New Hyde Park. Photographed the LIRR, NYW&B, NY City area streetcars, ELs, etc. as well as many other roads - 1933-1970s

ADELPHI CLASSROOM ON WHEELS
"One of the School’s more famous efforts was offering business classes on the Long Island Rail Road. From 1971 into 1987, nearly 1,000 students went through “Adelphi-on-Wheels.” 
Created by Adelphi Professor Gregory Gutman and Edu-Tran, Inc., it allowed business students to take classes during their morning and evening commutes.
Adelphi University School of Business Newsletter, Spring 2014 issue

Adelphi Classroom on Wheels Interior.jpg (67770 bytes)
The late Professor Greg Gutman started "Adelphi On Wheels"
 in the early 1970s.

Note the  modifications to a LIRR standard P72 coach.  This leads me to believe that the classroom car was operated as either the first car or the last car in the consist, so that no one would try to walk thru the car, and only student-passengers would sit in it.
Info: John Deasy

 

lirr171PronkonkomaMikeKoehler.jpg (65298 bytes)
The blanked windows in the picture at Ronkonkoma "KO" is perhaps the Adelphi Classroom on Wheels. Port Jefferson had one car for the classes  (a LIRR 2900-2993 series), and this is most likely what you are seeing here.


Graduation ceremony onboard a LIRR railroad car 1974

People magazine Adelphi Graduation November 3, 1975.jpg (120516 bytes)
People Magazine Adelphi Graduation 11/03/1975

 

 

Professor Gutman teaching in LIRR  modified coach.jpg (35854 bytes)
Professor Gutman teaching in LIRR modified coach

Adelphi-Edutrain MBA graduation ceremony at Grand Central Terminal.jpg (61530 bytes)
Adelphi "Edutrain" MBA Graduation ceremony at Grand Central Terminal 

The MTA signage makes no mention of Metro North, so this could be during the MTA Penn Central or MTA Conrail eras, prior to creation of Metro North.  A New Haven Line train of M-2 Cosmopolitan cars is on the track to the left and a train of former NYC streamliner coaches is the right, most likely a Hudson Line or Harlem Line train.  So, I am thinking the photo dates between 1971 and 1983.  Info: John Deasy

WEEKEND CHIEF - PARLOR CAR BAR MENU & DESIGNATION
Weekend-Chief-bar-Menu.jpg (105874 bytes)    Weekend-Chief-bar-Menu-back.jpg (71438 bytes)
Parlor Car Bar Menu front/back - Weekend Chief 1963
Archive: Edward Frye
Weekend-Chief-bar-Menu_page1.jpg (127496 bytes)    Weekend-Chief-bar-Menu_page2.jpg (86767 bytes)
Parlor Car Bar Menu pages - Weekend Chief 1963
Archive: Edward Frye

Quogue #460 Parlor Car
Archive: Jack Deasy
The "Golden Goose" of LIRR menus.  It was only produced in ONE year. My recollection is 1963. 
 
Now about the car designations. This is Pullman practice. Normally, the last two digits of the train number followed by an ordinal. Where conflicts could exist, the car designation could come from the first and last digits of the train number. So, (and I know that from experience) car 460 was the first (and always only) open parlor car for train #4016, the 5 PM weekend train, the slowest train to Montauk. All stops and three meets. I photographed it many times.
 
The car number matched the “diagram”, a cardboard list prepared by the reservation center showing the passenger name and destination. These were delivered to the train at Jamaica, normally via the MU conductor to the Special Services supervisor at Jamaica. This was a 100 percent reliable “relay team” from the B of I supervisor (Bureau of Information) at Penn Station to the MU  conductor. In later years, reservations were handled from the information bureau at Jamaica. During my era at Special Services, reservations were computerized (as early as 1985). When the Cannonball was running with 15-17 cars, special services assigned extra attendants as “space assigners”, i.e. the Cannonball generally had one space assigners for every three or four cars to handle passengers who didn’t have reservations. So the SS supervisor handed the diagrams to the space assigners.
 
When we computerized, it worked out fine. During the 80’s. we were mostly 100 percent booked eastbound (virtually everybody booked for the season and we were set up for season reservations).
Info: Richard Makse
 CAMP BLACK - 1898


Camp Black - Hempstead Plains, 1898 Fighting 69th drilling in column formation at Camp Black - from the Nassau County Museum Collection 
Camp Black was bounded on the north by Old Country Road, on the west by Clinton Road, and on the south by the Central Line rail; the current site of Roosevelt Field.

Camp Black was in service on the Hempstead Plains, from 4/29/1898 to 9/28/1898 during the Spanish-American war. The "Fighting 69th" trained there in May of that year. Hal Fullerton is listed on the title page. He was hired by the LIRR in 1897 and took most of his Long Island photographs in 1898 and 1899, but the camp was only open in 1898. Note: Camp Wyckoff in Montauk did the receiving and handled quarantining the malaria victims. Info: Dave Keller

Unique Long Island - Camp Black Edition 1898

 

camp black 1.jpg (98027 bytes)
Title page and photographic acknowledgements 1898

 


Unique Long Island - Camp Black Edition back cover
22nd Regiment Infantry NY Volunteers-LIRR Condr. Frank Erthal-Camp Black-Garden City, NY-5-24-1898.jpg (84874 bytes)
22nd Regiment Infantry NY Volunteers- LIRR Camp Black, 
Garden City 5/24/1898

The LIRR trainman to the left of center is Frank Erthal, who retired in 1950 after a very long career on the LIRR.  What he's doing in this image, I have no idea but he seemed to like to pose with groups. It's possible that his train was getting ready to ship the 22nd out and he posed with them before they all boarded. Info: Dave Keller

camp black 2.jpg (89762 bytes)
A day's outing at Wreck Lead near Long Beach

petroleum dust subduer.jpg (57363 bytes)
LIRR MOW petroleum dust subduer at work. c.1898
1910 PENN STATION AND EAST RIVER TUNNEL INSPECTION PASS to FAR ROCKAWAY 08/30/1910

1934corporateseal.jpg (11304 bytes)
Long Island Rail Road 1834 Corporate Seal


Tunnels Under East River to New York 1910 Seal

This was a special invitation run for all the invited big whig guests of the PRR and LIRR (also politicians and probably the press as well.) It was not open to the public. Hence the specially printed invitations. The big fanfare happened on September 8th, 1910 when it WAS opened to the public and the first train left Pennsylvania Station, NY for all points east.. Info: LIRR Historian, Dave Keller

THE STEINWAY LINES

Steinway-Sons-Piano-Factory-closeup-Astoria-3-7-38.jpg (132240 bytes)The Steinway Lines were operated by the Third Avenue Railway  System, which operated a vast streetcar system in Manhattan, Bronx and Westchester and wanted an operation in Queens as well, but several lines were already in place.  TARS was in operation from 1853 to 1953, whereupon they shut their doors and many cars were either burned or sold to India and/or Vienna, Austria.

The Steinway Lines had their own equipment but also ran TARS cars on their system.  They shared car barn space with the NY & Queens Transit at Woodside.  A terrible fire in the early 1930s destroyed a lot of the NY&QT and Steinway Lines equipment and a good portion of the car barn was torn down as a result.  I believe the TARS cars began to operate over the line after that conflagration and loss of equipment.  See 1st attachment.  This entire area where the Steinway cars are laid up was once under roof as the car barn.  After the fire, all that was left was to the right of the image, which was about the same size as the area lost.  In the background can be seen the NYCRR.

The line was named as such because a major portion of it ran along Steinway St. (named after the piano factory that was located there) and provided service between the College Point ferry westward, thru Flushing, Woodside and Astoria, then over the Queensboro (59th St.) bridge. TARS car is operating along Steinway St. passing the piano factory in the background. (below right)  

Steinway Sons Piano Factory - closeup Astoria 3/07/1938

Below is an actual Steinway Lines car operating at Broadway and Vernon Blvd. in Astoria. (below left) You'll notice another piano manufacturer's plant in this image.  I guess as so many piano makers lived here to work at Steinway & Sons, other companies followed suit, seeing the work force was handy . . . .

Steinway operations ceased in 1939 and all the TARS cars (both TARS and Steinway-lettered equipment) were returned to the TARS system for use elsewhere on their system.  The Queensboro Railway took over streetcar operations over the bridge until 1956 and was the last operating streetcar service in the 5 boroughs and Westchester.

All images are "George Votava photo, Dave Keller archive".

Steinway-Lines-Car-1662-Birney-B'way & Vernon Blvd-Astoria-3-19-38.jpg (99488 bytes)
Steinway Lines Car #1662 Birney at Broadway and 
Vernon Blvd., Astoria
3/19/1938

Steinway Lines Yard-529, 1671, 1669, 12, et. al-Woodside, NY - 8-22-39.jpg (85854 bytes)
Steinway Lines Yard #'s 529, 1671, 1669, 12, et. al. 
Woodside, NY  8/22/1939

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Steinway Lines Car #10 Steinway St. and 
19th Ave., Astoria
3/07/1938

 

OIL ELECTRIC BOXCABS

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LIRR #401 at DUNTON Tower receiving orders view N

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Brill Boxcab 402:1 at Philadelphia Pier 78, 
Delaware Ave. South Philly 3/21/26 Archive: Dave Morrison

The oil-electric boxcab #402:1, built in 1926, spent 2 weeks on the LIRR in a test run and was returned to J. G. Brill, the manufacturer. Info: Hank Raudenbush/Dave Keller

 

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LIRR #401 100 ton Oil-Electric 1/1926 
Railway Locomotive Engineering magazine article

    Road#   Class  Model     Builder  Serial#  Built   HP      

    401     AA-2   102-ton   AGEIR    66085    11/25   2x300    
    402:1    -      80-ton   Brill    22315     1/26   2x250    
    402:2   AA-3   109-ton   AGEIR    67330     9/28   2x300    
    403A/B  BS-6    87-ton@  B-W      60185-86  1/28   2x330    
    
    #403A/B semi-permanent coupled pair; later separated as Mike and Ike. Info: "Diesels of the Sunrise Trail" By John Scala

ROW POWER LINES 

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Islip 1944 view W Weber photo shows communication lines on the cross arms and a signal cable below. The few single wires below the cable are local telephone lines for a T-Box or station phone. The scarcity of wires on the upper cross-arms represent the abandonment of Weston Union telegraph services that previously used LIRR right of way and poles as local communication was replaced by Bell Telephone lines.


Amityville power lines  view E 2013 Photo: Jeremiah Cox

The very top single wire is a ground wire that carries no power and protects the array from lightning. The highest wires are high tension power feeds to the substations. The lowest of the high tension lines is usually 20 cycle signal current, which is used by the signal department for ASC and signal operation and is furnished from the substation at Woodside. Below that may be low tension local supply lines that carry 480 volts or 240 volts AC. On the lowest rungs are signal circuits, usually carried in cables, fiber optic lines (often sheathed in orange protection) and communication wires. The lowest cable are the  local signal circuits; signal communications between signal points. In the old days, telegraph wires were strung above telephone wires and many of those were owned by Western Union who leased space on LIRR poles. Many of the high tension poles on the LIRR date back to original electrification dates: 1906-1910 for the western Main Line, 1920's for the Montauk Branch. 

CHARLES W. HOPPE 1935-2015 - LIRR PRESIDENT 1990-1994

The thing that I remember most about Chuck Hoppe is that, thanks to him, we still have the name "Long Island Rail Road." Back in the early 90s, the MTA had the brilliant idea of changing the name of the LIRR to something like "Metro East." Chuck went to a board meeting and pounded on the table saying "Whatever you do, don't change the name Long Island Rail Road." He explained that the people of Long Island might have a love/hate relationship with the LIRR, but it is still their railroad. The employees have a lot of pride in the name too.

Chuck insisted that the name of the LIRR should not be changed. I guess that the MTA paid attention to what he said and left the name alone. Chuck Hoppe should be remembered for the fact that we still have the Long Island Rail Road today, after 181 years. David Morrison

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Charles W. Hoppe former LIRR President 1990-94 Newsday 12/25/15

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DE30 #418 NOSE DETAILS

CROSS BAY TUNNEL1936 STUDY 

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LIRR DE30 #418 Nose details 7/11/2015 Photo: Bob Bender


Cross Bay Union Freight Tunnel 1936 Port Authority Study Archive: Ralph Shellhamer 

 

NEW SIGNALS and SPEED CONTROL -  Railway Age 1952

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NEW SIGNALS and SPEED CONTROL -  Railway Age 1952
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Page 2 Map & Diagram
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Page 3 LIRR engine controls installation 
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Page 4 trackside signal control

G5s #39 RESTORATION ARTICLE by John Kilbride

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LI Steam Locomotive Restorations MUTUAL Magazine June-July 2015 Author: John Kilbride 
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PRR/LIRR G5s side view technical drawing
Collection: John Kilbride 
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LI Steam Locomotive Restorations MUTUAL Magazine June-July 2015 Page 2 Author: John Kilbride 

BICENTENNIAL HERITAGE CARS

lirr921_1976bicentennial.jpg (51769 bytes) 1976 Suffolk County Bicentennial Heritage Car LIRR #921 1976 Suffolk County Bicentennial Heritage Car 06/28/2007 Photo/Archive: Dave Keller

The Coney Island cars weren't the ones that were saved for the Bicentennial. Any that went to Coney Island were scrapped, unless they are still hidden away there. These are probably the cars restored for the Bicentennial in 1976. 

Cars #1900 and #921, non-electrified, made up the "Suffolk County Bicentennial Heritage Train" and were pulled out east by diesel. Cars #1632 and #1391, electrified, made up the "Nassau County Heritage Train." I have shots of both trains taken in 1976. Afterwards, #1632 went on display at one of the platforms at Flatbush Avenue Station. I have a shot of it there in 1978. 

MP54C-1900_Terryville, NY_4-18-15_TimDarnell.jpg (65253 bytes) MP54C-1900_terryville_4-18-15_TimDarnell.jpg (64335 bytes) North Brookhaven Chamber of Commerce LIRR MP54C #1900 at Terryville, NY 4/18/15 
Photos: Tim Darnell

After the bicentennial celebration wound down, one of the cars went to the LIE rest area in Brentwood. I believe the combine wound up at the corner of Rt. 112 and Nesconset Hwy in Port Jefferson. (Not sure if the combine was the same one or not . . . . too many years ago for my mind to be working efficiently.) 

The ones chosen for repainting and a quick renovation were taken from the set that the Long Island- Sunrise Trail Chapter of the NRHA had chosen for preservation. They were a representative selection of the different types that were on line in the mid '70's. 

Bob Sturm and Win Boerkel, former railroad officials and Chapter officers, took great pains to talk the railroad into giving those cars to the chapter to look after. Then they sought ways of keeping them around. 

After the exhibit was done they were moved from place to place in an effort to hide them from scrapping, much as Don Harold hid the NYTA museum cars. 

The chosen cars for the Bicentennial exhibit were those in the best structural shape. The renovation consisted of painting the interior and exterior, lettering them, and cleaning the bearings so they would roll. The brakes weren't serviced so the cars had to be towed with an engine on each end and a brake hose down the middle. The seats were removed and interior lighting converted to 110 Volts. 

The pictures shown were taken when the circus train came to Shea, causing unwanted attention to be paid to the hidden cars. The railroad's president at the time, who really didn't care much for old crap, wanted them "pushed down the hill into Corona Yard and into the creek..." the final trip for most of the other MP54's.   

LIRR MARITIME ROSTER 
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Maritime Roster - "Steel Rails to the Sunrise" (Ziel-Keller)
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The “Rockaway,” like all the other vehicular ferries, crossed the East River bringing LIRR riders and others as well as horse carts and wagons (automobiles in their later years) from Long Island to Manhattan and return. 

The “Rockaway” was built in 1879, and sold to the Norfolk County Ferry Co. (VA) in June, 1910.  It was scrapped there in July, 1912.  Research: Dave Keller
LIST OF PRESIDENTS AND TRUSTEES OF THE LONG ISLAND RAIL ROAD

List of Presidents and Trustees of the Long Island Rail Road

• Knowles Taylor: 1835-1837
• Valentine Hicks: 1837-1838
• Waldron B. Post: 1838-1839
• George B. Fisk: 1839-1847
• James H. Weeks: 1847-1850
• Isaac E. Haviland: 1850-1851
• Moses Maynard, Jr.: 1851-1852
• Isaac E. Haviland: 1852-1853
• William E. Morris: 1853-1862
• Coffin Colket: 1862-1863
• Oliver Charlick: 1863-1875
• Henry Havemeyer: 1875-1876
• Conrad Poppenhusen: 1876
• David N. Ropes: 1876-1877
• Adolph Poppenhusen: 1877
• Thomas R. Sharp: 1877-1881
• Austin Corbin: 1881-1896
• William H. Baldwin: 1896-1905
• William F. Potter: 1905
• Ralph Peters: 1905-1923
• Samuel Rea: 1923-1928
• David E. Smucker and H.L. Delatour: 1949-1950 Note 1
• William H. Draper: 1950-1951
• William Wyer: 1951-1954
• Walter S. Franklin: 1954-1955
• Thomas M. Goodfellow: 1955-1967
• Frank Aikman, Jr.: 1967-1969
• Walter L. Schlager, Jr.: 1969-1976
• Robert K. Pattison: 1976-1978
• Francis S. Gabreski: 1978-1981
• Daniel T. Scannell: 1981
• Robin H.H. Wilson: 1981-1985
• Bruce C. McIver: 1985-1989
• Charles W. Hoppe: 1990-1994
• Thomas F. Prendergast: 1994-2000
• Kenneth J. Bauer: 2000-2003
• James J. Dermody: 2003-2006
• Raymond P. Kenny (acting): 2006-2007
• Helena Williams: 2007-2014
• Patrick Nowakowski: 2014-present

Note 1: The LIRR was operated by the Pennsylvania Railroad from 1928 to 1949. The Presidents and Trustees from Smucker/Delatour through Wyer (1949-1954) were trustees rather than presidents, as the LIRR was in Chapter 77 bankruptcy.

LIRR MONOGRAM DATA SHEET

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The Pennsy years brought the keystone logo, appearing in early LIRR ads from 1917 (Info: Art Huneke),  February 1924 on the Long Island Information Bulletin, and the May 14, 1924 timetable.

This logo was used as a herald only on the DD-1 electric locos after the pin-striping of 1939. Prior to the pin-striping the logo was not utilized. Research: Dave Keller

AAR INSPECTION CONSIST

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AAR #110 #100 Dolton, IL 11/20/10 Archive: Sam Beck

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AAR #110 #100 Jamaica 7/17/12 NY Times Photo: Damon Winter
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AAR 100 110 LI City 8/11/14 
Photo: Dave Barraza

LIRR MP15AC #158 and #168 consist of Association of American Railroads Research car AAR #100 and AAR #110 track loading vehicle. 

AAR #100 brown track loading vehicle is what houses the hydraulics. It is a telemetry car and it puts a load on the rails both downward and outward to test the track integrity. The outward test puts pressure on the running rails from the inside pushing out. 

The test/research car AAR #110 has all the computers, GPS, etc, along with a kitchenette, bathroom, shower, etc. to test the tracks for max load and measures deflection including sideways loading to check spread.

It is an extensive process to get all the testing done as not all tests can be done simultaneously. The load testing can only be done in one direction (with the research car leading) with a maximum speed around 20 mph.

READING A TRAIN ORDER FORM 31
Form-31-Train-Order-WC-11-3-17.jpg (158567 bytes)This is a Form 31 train order issued at "WC" cabin at Upton Junction on November 3, 1917.  Form 31 orders had to be signed for upon receipt by the conductor and engineer of a train.  They were not caught "on the fly" as were form 19 orders.  "WC" cabin was the former, unused "CP" cabin at Central Islip, shown here in service at Upton Junction.  An interesting note about the instructions in this order:  see the reference to "Y" and "PT" cabins which were on the Montauk branch at Sayville and Eastport, respectively, but "WC" cabin was on the Main Line.  During the operation of Camp Upton in WWI, trains to and from the camp were routed in a one-direction circle.  Trains were dispatched eastbound into the camp and, in leaving the camp were sent further eastbound to Manorville, where they then headed towards Eastport ("PT" cabin), then westward back to the  west end of Long Island, so as to not interfere with trains headed for the camp.  (Dave Keller archive and data)

The train order, issued to C&E of Engine #97 on 11/3/1917 at 9:54 AM and made complete at 10:06 AM by block operator E. B. Coons:

1st Part: Engine #97 (D56 American-type) was running an extra (not scheduled) passenger run between Upton Junction (WD cabin) and east of Sayville (Y cabin), the easternmost extent of double track on the Montauk branch.)  

This move would have been accomplished by heading east from Upton Junction to Manorville, down the connection to Eastport, using the westward-curving wye track there to head back in a westbound direction to Sayville on the Montauk branch (see Emery map for this curved track of which I speak).

2nd Part: Another locomotive, #145 (G53 ten-wheeler) is running light (no train) and is also heading east but over the Montauk branch, and this locomotive (#145) has the right-of-way over the eventually westbound locomotive #97 between Y cabin east of Sayville and PT cabin in Eastport.

Therefore, once locomotive #97 and its train hits the Montauk branch, that engineer and engine needs to take whatever siding it may be required to take, as engine #145 approaches from the opposite direction. 

Both are aware that they are headed towards each other and need to look out for a distant headlight or plume of smoke, as well as a block signal in their direction displaying a "STOP" aspect.  As both locomotives are extras, they are not scheduled on the employee timetables, so nobody really knows where the two will meet up.  But based upon the time they were both dispatched, it was determined that they WOULD meet somewhere between Y and PT cabins.

Being a Form 31 order, the engineer and conductor to whom it was issued needed to sign for it at the place of issuance, which was, in this case, WC cabin at Upton Jct.  The conductor's name was Lehman and the engineer's name was H. L. Wyckoff.

The engineer of #145 would have picked up HIS orders at whatever block station he was at prior to HIS eastbound move advising him that HE would have right over engine 97 west, PT to Y.

Now . . . while both engines were headed towards each other along the Montauk branch, both would probably pick up additional orders along the route from any of the numerous block offices that existed back then, (one at EACH station except Hagerman) advising both engineers where the meet would take place, as the locations became more fine-tuned and what they were required to do.  

The subsequent orders would read something like this:

To C&E Eng 97: Eng 97 and passenger extra west meets extra 145 east at ________.  Eng 97 take siding.  

To Engineer Eng 145: Extra 145 east meets Eng 97 at __________.  Eng 97 take siding.

During WWI, there were block offices open all over the Main Line and Montauk branch due to the increased train traffic to and from Camp Upton.  I even have a train order issued in 1917 at HOLTSVILLE of all places!!!  This was a block office only during WWI.  After the war it went back to being just a ticket office.

After the war ended and the LIRR finally shut down operations in the camp in April, 1921, WC cabin at Upton Jct. was closed and demolished. 

During WWII with the reopening of Camp Upton, a smaller cabin was constructed, and placed in service with the call letters CU.  It remained in used into the mid-1960s as a telephone shanty at Upton Junction, tracks of which continued to service Brookhaven National Laboratory.
(Dave Keller archive and data)

STATION NUMBERS
LIRR A.D.L. 205 Manual of Instructions to Conductors and Collectors lists the station numbers alphabetically and numerically for both the Operating Department (O.D.) and the Accounting Department (A.D.). These numbers can be found on LIRR passenger tickets; for example. Archive: Brad Phillips

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These numbers are "newer" numbers from the much older style where 1/2 mile designations were used (i.e. station number of S59-1/2 strictly made-up for example purposes only. ) The signal designations, the letters stand for the branch/division. Info: Dave Keller

"N," which stands for North Side Division, the old name for the Port Washington branch.  
Check out Auburndale, Corona, Elmhurst, etc. below . . all indicated as "N". For example: 
N-5 is Elmhurst:  5 miles from Winfield Jct., the start of the Port Wash (North Side) branch.

A Atlantic
F Far Rockaway
G Greenport (Main Line)
H Hempstead
L Long Beach
N North Side Division (old name Port Washington Branch)
O Oyster Bay
P Port Jefferson
S South Shore (Montauk Branch)
R Rockaway
W West Hempstead

SWITCHING ROSLYN


Model Railroader Planning 2004 - Concept/Drawing design: Steven Lynch Execution: MR Staff

When I was a teenager I used to tag along with the conductor on the Oyster Bay freight, which ran every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. There first stop was a lumber yard south of Mineola Coal . Mineola Coal is where I met up with them, there was a lay over track there and Mineola Coal was on one side of Jericho Turnpike and on the other side was a large switching area they called "the Hole".

In that large complex was Mineola Paper, Albertson Lumber, Local Steel, Mineola Plumbing, Latham Brothers Lumber, Windsor Coal, Pittsburgh Glass, an Iron Works Company, a candy company and another paper company at the end. After spotting cars there, we always took a yellow fruit growers express refrigeration car and put it behind the engine, this was done just about every time on the scheduled run. The fruit growers express refrigeration car was headed to Helena Rubenstein.

We would lay over, either at the Hole or Mineola Coal, and wait for the next north bound train to Oyster Bay as soon as the block would clear we would follow it up to Roslyn. At Roslyn we would leave the main body of the train in Roslyn and take the car up to Helena Rubenstein. 

I remember the conductor telling the engineer to go extremely slow on that siding, something about the curve not being right. After we spotted the car and picked up our empty we head back to Roslyn. By this time the southbound train going to Penn Station would have gone by and we would get permission to cross over at the Roslyn Crossover and leave our empty cars and any cars for Roslyn on the south side and any cars we had for Albertson's Steel we had which was on the south side. We would cross back over pick up our loaded cars and head north towards Oyster Bay. Our next stop was usually Sea Cliff. There was a team track in Glen Head , but it was rarely used, delivering boulders in gondolas. Provided by: Bill

CHAINING MEASURING

Robert Emery hand-drawn map 08/1958 which covers "500' east of Hillside Station to MP12" and at the top of the map there's a rough-written addition saying "MP 584+62.

The use of MP for a survey station is incorrect,  but mileposts are so much more commonly used on a railroad, somebody was thinking of that.

58462 feet, a little over ten miles would be just about right for that location, measuring from Long Island City via the Montauk Branch.  Jamaica is 9.3 miles.  If i remember right, mileposts East of Jamaica are measured via the Montauk Branch, not via Woodside, which would be a little further.   Coincidentally, the distance from Flatbush Ave to Jamaica is also shown as 9.3 miles.  Info: Henry Raudenbush 

Chaining in the US is done in increments of 100 feet.  Every 100 feet from the starting point is a location called a (survey) "station".  So station 582 would be 58,200 feet from the starting point.  It would be referred to as 582+00.  The number after the plus is the distance in feet from the previous station; so 582+36 would be 58,236 feet from the starting (zero) point.  "Chaining" refers to the fact that in early days, the distances were measured out with an actual chain.  In early days, a distance of 66 feet was a "chain" comprised of 100 links; this is still used by British railways.  You will see references in British fan publications to a distance such as "6 miles, 11 ch." Currently still in use by surveyors in route surveying and curve surveying along with elevations.
 
The zero station might be the actual beginning of a line, or it may be an arbitrary point.   Most of the chaining of the IRT and BMT begins from actual points where lines (or segments of lines) began.  For historical reasons, usually outward from downtown Manhattan.  As a result sometimes chaining runs in opposite directions on different segments of the same line.  The Lexington Ave. IRT from City Hall to 40th St is chained northward from a zero at City Hall.   But the extension to South Ferry and Brooklyn is chained southward from about the same point.
 
To avoid having chaining run in opposite directions, the IND picked an arbitrary point, probably about in the West 4th St station, and called it Station 1000.  This way, whether they extended south (numbers going down) to Coney Island or north (numbers going up) to the top of the Bronx, the numbers could run in a continuous series.  They did not foresee the Rockaway line, which might have gone below 0, but in the event, they acquired the LIRR drawings, etc of that line, so used the LIRR chaining, which comes from a zero at Long Island City.
 
Railroads seem to have used chaining for their civil engineering, but mile posting for operational activities.   Most railroads have been worked over many times since they were built, with relocations and cutoffs changing the length of the line. If they tried to keep the mileposts spaces 5280 feet apart, the MP at the far end of the line would have to be on wheels!  Instead, after any relocation, there will be two mileposts at an irregular spacing.   

For example, the original PRR line between Trenton and Philadelphia swung through the middle of Bristol, with many grade crossings.  About 1909, the PRR built a cutoff bypassing Bristol, with grade separation, and shortening the line.  Mileposts 66 and 67 are 4000 feet apart. The chaining in such a case will have what is called an "equation".  At some point on the drawings there will be a line drawn across the line with two chaining numbers listed, one for the chaining up to that point, a different one for the chaining going forward.   Research: Henry Raudenbush 

LIRR ELECTRIFIED ROUTES

Main Line to Ronkokoma 
Port Jefferson to Huntington 
Montauk/Babylon branch to Babylon 
Hempstead (entire branch) 
West Hempstead (entire branch) 
Long Beach (entire branch) 
Far Rockaway (entire branch) 
Port Washington (entire branch)
Oyster Bay is electrified to East Williston.
Hunterspoint Ave. 
Long Island City, but the LIC yard station tracks are not. However, there are four tracks in the yard that do have third rail. LIC "yards" one electric train in the AM rush hour (discharges passengers at HPA) that then extras back as an equipment train to Jamaica or Hillside after the rush hour is over. 

In the afternoon, one electric equipment train comes out of Jamaica with no passengers gets yarded and then goes up and picks up passengers for Ronkonkoma later. 

The potential to yard four MU trains in LIC is twofold. One, if there is a disabled train that is barely limping along they will divert it to LIC rather than risk sending it through the East River Tunnel and jamming up the rush hour. The other benefit to that is that gets it out of the way of busiest track section of the LIRR. 

The other reason for those four electrified tracks is if there is a large diversion from Penn Station for whatever reason LIC can yard four electrics and store another two in HPA if conditions warrant. 

The other way in and out of LIC is the lower Montauk and that is not electrified.

LIRR NAMED TRAINS

NAMED TRAINS OF THE LONG ISLAND RAIL ROAD: Christopher T. Baer September 8, 2009

Beachcomber
Cannon Ball - Westbound Friday all parlor, first stop Westhampton 
lirrcannonball.jpg (97624 bytes)Parlor 1st Jamaica Cannonball at Easthampton 09/1962
Collection: Dave Keller

 



The Cannonball (1899 – present) which runs from Long Island City to Montauk via Jamaica. The only currently named LIRR passenger train. Originally run in two sections: one to Greenport; and the other to Montauk; splitting from each other at Manorville along the Main Line. Greenport section was discontinued in 1942. Train survived into the MTA era and is currently operated on Friday evenings from May through October as a twelve car train offering two all reserved parlor cars with full bar service. Runs express between Jamaica and Westhampton Beach.

East Ender - Eastbound Thurs & Fri mixed (parlor/coach) train, leaving Jamaica around 5:00 p.m.
Ebb Tide - Westbound mixed parlor and coach, Sunday afternoon , before The Sundowner.
lirr215EbbTide.jpg (33051 bytes)Montauk Summer 1967 Photo/Archive: Edward Frye






Fisherman's Special - (1932–1973) which ran from Long Island City to Canoe Place Station and Montauk via Jamaica. April through October train with service terminating at Canoe Place station in April, and then extended on to Montauk in May. Served Long Island fishing trade.

Hampton Express
Hampton Reserve - Eastbound Friday 4:06pm from Penn Station to Montauk. Westbound Sundays at 6:37pm from Montauk to Penn. (2014-xxxx)
Montauk Light - Eastbound May 1989 timetable #16 leaves Hunterspoint Point Ave. at 4:08pm, Jamaica at 4:25pm operating nonstop to WH arriving at 5:39pm, and Montauk at 6:38pm 
Partridge
Peconic Bay Express
Shelter Island Express - Long Island City to Greenport via Jamaica. Friday only summer express train that connected to Shelter Island ferries. 
lirr-train217-deadhead-equipment_Shelter-Island-Express_6-7-68_RichardMakse.jpg (43906 bytes)

In the 1960's, The Shelter Island Express routinely ran with a single parlor car in June, increasing to two cars in the high season of July and August. After a 40 minute layover, enough time to cut off the engine and turn it on the turntable, train #217 was created for what was usually an express run to Jamaica. Here #217 awaits its departure from Greenport with two pings and the parlor Quogue. 6/07/68 Archive: Richard Makse


Shinnecock Express
Peconic Bay and Shinnecock Bay Express (1926-1950) which ran from Long Island City to Greenport and Montauk via Jamaica. Two Saturday only trains running express to Greenport and Montauk respectively. Discontinued during World War II though revived for a few seasons afterwards. 

South Shore Express
Sundowner - Westbound Sunday evening 
Sunrise Special
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 G5s #21 Sunrise Special eastbound Central Islip c.1927 Archive: Dave Keller

Sunrise Special (1922–1942) which ran from Pittsburgh to Montauk via Penn Station, New York. Joint PRR and LIRR train that operated during the summer. Trains ran eastbound on Fridays and westbound Mondays. During 1926 summer season trains were run daily. After 1932 there was an additional eastbound trip on Thursdays. Complete first class train from 1932 to 1937.

Wall Street Special - Westbound Monday morning, Montauk to Hunters Point Avenue.
Weekender - Eastbound Friday evening 

LIRR ARCHIVE LOCATIONS

Ron Ziel’s collection is at the Queensboro Public Library’s Long Island collection in Jamaica, NY.

George Brainerd’s 1870s-1880s era glass plates are in the LI collection at the Brooklyn Public Library.

Robert Emery’s collection is in the LI collection at the SUNY @ Stony Brook.

Charles B. Chaney’s collection is in the Smithsonian Institution.

Fullerton’s collection is split between glass plate negatives in the collection at the Suffolk County Historical Society in Riverhead and Ron Ziel’s collection (see above).

Vincent Seyfried’s collection has been sold via e-Bay.

  LIE CONSTRUCTION BEGINS QUEENS 1954 at 57th Ave LIRR

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Eastbound passing 57th Ave. 1954 Photo: LIRR  Archive: Jim Gillin 
This photo depicts early construction of the LIE. The concrete pad in the foreground is for the relocated high tension line to the original Woodhaven Junction substation. Note that Rockaway 2 and 1 are still both in service. 
 
The row homes immediately to the right of the head end of the eastbound train on ML4 are on 57th Avenue; that's a public school in the background of those homes and the footbridge across the tracks is 55th Avenue. When I was first married, we lived at the foot of 53rd Avenue on the north side of the right of way. The building is still there. Richard F. Makse

LESTER C. TICHY, Architect 1905 – 1981

Lester C. Tichy, Architect 1905 – 1981  Employed by the PRR and influenced by the renowned PRR designer Raymond Fernand Loewy


Lester C. Tichy, 369 Lexington Avenue , NY City 8/03/1944
Archive: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington , D.C. 2054

A representative example of the moderne style favored by Tichy that he designed.

Aberdeen Southbound Station, MD 1940's view S
Archive: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington , D.C. 20540

LIRR Tichy Paint Scheme 11/1/49 through 1955

lirr1495-MP54Bklyn1956.jpg (92980 bytes)
LIRR #1495 MP54 Brooklyn 1956 Archive: Dave Keller

Applied to all passenger cars, some DD1 electric locos, electric shop switchers, and ALCO RS1 units. RS1 units repainted up until 11/1/52. 


Only locomotives wore the Long Island shadowed map logo. FM C-liners arrived in this scheme in Jan. 1950.


LIRR #2001 FM CPA20-5 Morris Park Shops


LIRR #2401 FM-CPA24-5   LIRR #2008 FM CPA20-5  Port Jefferson Station 1952

LIRR holds press run of 5 new air-conditioned P72 cars to Greenport.  Tichy scheme abandoned in favor of dark gray body with orange end doors and dark green roof (all psgr. cars) per Keystone magazine 1955-1961.    5/23/55 

LIRR Stations: Closed/Reopened/Removed/Replaced

LIRR Stations that Closed and Reopened as the same Structure

BLUEPOINT 
S. SIDE R.R. DEPOT OPENED: 2/1/1870, CLOSED: 6/1/1882
2ND DEPOT OPENED: JUNE/1900, RAZED: 1951
CONCRETE SHELTER SHED BUILT: 1951, DISCONTINUED AS STATION STOP: 1980

CEDARHURST 
S. SIDE R.R. BEGAN SVC: 7/1869. 
BUILT: 7/1872 (Per Vincent Seyfried’s LIRR history. 3-year gap??)
RIVAL L.I.R.R. ALSO BUILT DEPOT: 7/1872 
AFTER MERGER OF 2 ROADS, OCEAN POINT DEPOT AND L.I.R.R. DEPOT
ABANDONED: 6/1876. L.I.R.R. DEPOT MOVED TO FAR ROCKAWAY: 8/1881
S.S.R.R. DEPOT AT OCEAN POINT REOPENED: 6/1887, GREATLY REMODELED: 5/1888
3RD DEPOT BUILT: 1913

EDGEWOOD 
MAIN LINE 
OPENED: 6/1892, CLOSED: 10/21/13, BURNED: 1920

DEER PARK 
4TH DEPOT RELOCATED FURTHER EAST OF FORMER LOCATION, Executive Drive
WITH HI-LEVEL PLATFORMS IN SVC: 9/14/87

KISSENA PARK 
CRR OF LI 
OPENED: 6/1873, CLOSED: 8/1876. RE-OPENED: 6/1877, ABANDONED: 4/30/1879, MOVED TO 
PRIVATE LOCATION, BURNED: 5/8/18

MAPLE GROVE 
MAIN LINE 
OPENED: MAY/1879 AS FLAG STOP FOR MAPLE GROVE CEMETERY. 
CLOSED: 1882. REOPENED: 1883. REMOVED IN 1909 WITH REALIGNMENT OF TRACKS. 
MOVED APPROX. 600’ SOUTH ALONGSIDE NEW SITE OF KEW STATION (WHICH OPENED 
9/8/1910) AND PERPENDICULAR TO TRACKS FOR USE AS REAL ESTATE OFFICE FOR DEVELOPERS
OF KEW. RAZED A SHORT TIME LATER.

MASPETH 
OPENED: 2/1895, CLOSED: 10/1903, REOPENED: ?, AND AGAIN CLOSED: 1924, BLDG. REMOVED: 1925
DISCONTINUED AS STATION STOP.

SOUTH SIDE R.R. CROSSING
EVERGREEN 
OPENED: 5/15/1878 AT THE CROSSING OF THE BUSHWICK BRANCH.
CLOSED: 5/25/1881. REOPENED: 6/1886 WHEN SERVICE STARTED OUT OF BUSHWICK TERMINAL AS A 
SUBSTITUTE FOR THE GREENPOINT ABANDONMENT. CLOSED: AT END OF 1890 SEASON.

LIRR Stations that closed and reopened as the same name but as different structures:

CAMP UPTON 
UPTON SPUR 
OPENED ON THE CAMP GROUNDS: 1917. CLOSED WITH END OF LIRR SVC. TO THE CAMP: 4/1922

CAMP UPTON 
UPTON SPUR 
OPENED ON THE CAMP GROUNDS: c. 1942. CLOSED WITH END OF LIRR SVC. TO THE CAMP: c. 1946

DUNTON 
OPENED: ? AT VAN WYCK AVE., CLOSED: 1910
2ND, RELOCATED DEPOT BUILT: 1914, OUT OF SVC: 11/1/39 AND RAZED WITH ATLANTIC AVENUE IMPROVE-
MENT PROJECT: 1939-40 

QUOGUE 
BUILT: 6/1875 2ND DEPOT BUILT: 1882, MOVED TO PRIVATE LOCATION: 1905
3RD DEPOT BUILT; 1905, AGENCY CLOSED: 1958, RAZED: 4/64 
DISCONTINUED AS STATION STOP: 3/16/98

WORLD’S FAIR 
1ST STATION IN SVC: 1939-40, RAZED 
2ND STATION IN SVC: 1/11/61. RENAMED “SHEA STADIUM”: 4/15/66

LIRR Stations that closed and reopened as different names but on same site:

GOLF GROUNDS 
OPENED: 4/1907, DISCONTINUED AS STATION STOP: 1939, MOVED TO PRIVATE LOCATION: 1940

SOUTHAMPTON COLLEGE 
OPENED: 5/24/76 AT OLD “GOLF GROUNDS” STATION SITE, 528’ WEST OF MP86. DISCONTINUED AS STATION STOP AND REMOVED: 3/16/98


WORLD’S FAIR 
1ST STATION IN SVC: 1939-40, RAZED AFTER CLOSE OF FAIR.

UNITED NATIONS 
EAST OF CORONA STATION. IN SVC: 9/15/46. OUT OF SVC: c. 1952 (SITE OF 1939 WORLD’S FAIR STATION)

LIRR Station buildings that were removed and replaced after a major period of time but station stops remained in use:

GREAT RIVER 
BUILT: 1897, BURNED: 1943. AGENCY CLOSED: ? 
2ND DEPOT BUILT: ?, RAZED: c. 2000
3rd DEPOT WITH HI-LEVEL PLATFORMS BUILT: c. 2000-2001

GREENLAWN 
BUILT: 1868, BURNED: 1909
2ND DEPOT OPENED: 9/1911. AGENCY CLOSED: ? 

HICKSVILLE: 
1ST DEPOT OPENED: 3/1/1837 AS TEMPORARY TERMINUS OF LIRR. BURNED: 7/15/1864
2ND DEPOT OPENED: 9/1873, MOVED TO PRIVATE LOCATION: 1909
3RD DEPOT OPENED: 10/30/1909, RAZED: 11/62
ELEVATED STRUCTURE BUILT: 1962

HILLSIDE: 
MAIN LINE 
BUILT: ?, CLOSED: 1911
2ND DEPOT IN SVC: 5/15/11. LOW PLATFORMS OUT OF SVC: 10/1/30 ACCOUNT “JAMAICA IMPROVEMENT EAST” PROJECT. 
EASTWARD HIGH LEVEL PLATFORM SOUTH OF TRACK 1, IN SVC: 10/1/30 FOR EASTWARD AND WESTWARD TRAINS. 
AGENCY CLOSED: ? . DEPOT USED AS PRIVATE BUSINESS. 
DISCONTINUED AS STATION STOP: 7/1/66.

HILLSIDE 
MAIN LINE 
EMPLOYEE-ONLY STOP AT HILLSIDE MAINT. FACILITY (1990s?)

JAMESPORT 
1ST DEPOT APPEARS ON TIMETABLE OF 6/14/1845. DEPOT REMOVED: AUG-SEPT/ 1869. 
2ND DEPOT WAS A PRIVATE SALOON PURCHASED FOR USE AS DEPOT: 7/1878. GREATLY REMODELED: 
1944, AGENCY CLOSED: 1958, RAZED: 7/18/63.
RELOCATED SHELTER SHED OPENED: 7/18/63, DISCONTINUED AS STATION STOP: 19 ? 

MANORVILLE 
APPEARS ON TIMETABLE OF 6/14/1845 AS “ST. GEORGE’S MANOR” AND LATER SHORTENED TO “MANOR.” RAZED: 9/1869 
(Per local history, the first station agent, Seth Raynor, a patriot, painted out the “St. George’s,” leaving “Manor.” The town 
name changed to Manorville with opening of the post office, but timetables and LIRR documents retained the name “Manor” 
until c. 1907-1908.) 
2ND DEPOT BUILT: 5/1871. STATION RE-NAMED “MANORVILLE” c. 1910. RAZED: 6/41
SHELTER SHED BUILT: 1941, RAZED: c. 1968 AND DISCONTINUED AS STATION STOP.

MEDFORD 
1ST DEPOT OPENED: 6/26/1844 WITH OPENING OF LIRR OUT TO TEMPORARY END-OF-TRACK AT CARMAN’S RIVER. BURNED: 
8/20/1863
2ND (?) DEPOT BUILT: 1889 WITH ATTACHED AGENT’S QUARTERS. RAZED: 1940 WITH GRADE CROSSING ELIMINATION OF RT. 112.
3RD, ELEVATED DEPOT OPENED: 11/9/40. AGENCY CLOSED: 1958. RAZED: 1964
4TH, ELEVATED DEPOT WITH HI-LEVEL PLATFORMS BUILT: 2000-01

MURRAY HILL 
BUILT: 1889-90, RAZED: 10/1912 
2ND, ELEVATED DEPOT OPENED: 7/1914 (STATION BLDG. SPANNED DEPRESSED TRACKS) RAZED: 9/64

PORT JEFFERSON 
OPENED: 1/1873, BURNED: 2/1/1874 
2ND DEPOT BUILT: 6/1875, CLOSED: 1903 AND USED AS YARD BLDG, RAZED: 4/1963
3RD DEPOT OPENED: 7/25/03, REMODELED: 1968. STATION FACILITIES TEMPORARILY OUT OF SVC: 4/18/88. 
TEMPORARY STATION FACILITIES 75’ WEST OF MAIN ST. IN SVC: 4/25/88. 
MAIN BUILDING BACK IN SVC: ? RESTORED TO ORIGINAL ARCHITECTURE: 2000-01

Research: Dave Keller

HUNTINGTON STATION LOCATION

1909HuntingtonConstructRoute110girderbridgeOldStationbldginbackground.jpg (64591 bytes)
The original station that opened in 1868 was located west of New York Avenue on the north side of the tracks (present station is also on north side of the tracks, east of NY Ave.).  

The photograph was taken during the 1909 Route 110 bridge installation. The photographer was facing west. This photo was from the collection of William Ahern, of Ahern Landscape Design Center.

Huntington-EdLange-artwork.jpg (68757 bytes)
The art print was drawn by the famous Long Island artist of the late 1880s Edward Lang. Lang's view looks northwest. Research: Dave Morrison

LIRR TRAIN NUMBERS

00-100 Trains out of Babylon
200  Scoots east of Ronkonkoma
300  Great Neck/Little Neck
400 Port Washington
500 Oyster Bay
600  Port Jefferson
700 Hempstead
800 Long Beach
900 West Hempstead
1000 Trains that start making stops Amityville-Merrick
1100 Freeport
1200 Hicksville
1300 Jamaica-Penn
1400 Jamaica-Atlantic Terminal
1500 East Williston
1600 Huntington/Cold Spring Harbor
1700 Huntington
2000 Ronkonkoma
2100 Ronkonkoma Extra trains during the holidays
2300 Farmingdale/Bethpage
2700 Montauk Branch diesel trains (Montauk/Speonk/Pachogue)
2800 Far Rackaway
6000 Weekend Babylon
6100 Weekend Babylon
6200 Weekend Greenport Scoots
6400 Weekend Port Washington
6500 Weekend Oyster Bay
6600 Weekend Port Jefferson
6700 Weekend Hempstead
6800 Weekend Long Beach
6900 Weekend West Hempstead
7600 Weekend Huntington
7700 Weekend Huntington
8000 Weekend Ronkonkoma
8700 Weekend Montauk Branch Diesel

Montauk branch: trains that terminate/originate at Speonk are 273, and Patchogue trains are 276 

1900 Belmont Park
2400 Westbury
7100 Weekend Freeport
7400 Weekend Jamaica-Atlantic Terminal
7900 Weekend Belmont Park
8800 Weekend Far Rockaway

These are listed in the electronic schedules the MTA makes available to software developers, but might just be codes used to differentiate weekly holiday trains with more or less stops than their non-holiday counterparts:

3400 Montauk
3800 Port Washington
3900 Huntington
4000 Belmont Park (the 19xx trains are in the developer schedules as 4xxx trains)


This is the current numbering sequence that was placed into effect in more recent years as posted via the net: April 2010

Train numbering from the 1980's, and earlier, had some different designations; i.e. Montauk and Speonk runs had one and two-digit train numbers, as well as Babylon trains running along the electrified south shore Montauk branch.  

The 4-digit runs (5000, 6000, 7000, etc.) didn’t exist except for the Saturday, Sunday and Holiday trains which had their regular designation with the prefix of “4” added.  (ex:  Greenport Train #204 (east) and #211 (west) would be numbered #4204 and #4211, respectively.)

Al so, 200-numbered trains were for the ENTIRE Ronkonkoma /Greenport branch, ...  not just the Scoots east of Ronkonkoma as this schedule shows as the assigned numbers on today’s railroad.

The current listing really breaks down trains into much more detail,  i.e. trains to Hicksville or trains to Huntington , etc.

Years back, trains to Hicksville usually went straight on to Huntington, if electric or to Port Jeff if diesel, or went on to Ronkonkoma or along the Central branch to Babylon and points east, also for diesel and therefore were assigned the train number of the branch upon which they terminated (i.e. 600 = Port Jeff or 200 = Ronkonkoma/Greenport)

I can’t recall that ANY trains terminated at Hicksville but, I may be wrong and just don’t remember. 

When the Hicksville-Ronkonkoma push-pull diesel shuttle ran prior to electrification out to Ronkonkoma , the electric trains out to Hicksville went on to Huntington and passengers had to change at Hicksville for the push-pull diesel shuttle to Ronkonkoma .  Research/Info: Dave Keller

SILL'S FARM, GREENPORT

4210_sillsdairyfarm09-04-1967richmakse.jpg (78268 bytes)Sill's Dairy Farm at milepost 93 was nearing the end of its useful life when I took this photo of LIRR train #4210 with two parlors on Labor Day, 1967 across the Farm's pond. Sills was an established dairy that supplied the North Fork. Happily, I own a quart milk bottle embossed Sills' Dairy, Greenport, NY. 09/04/1967 View E Photo/Info: Richard F. Makse

     

sillsdairyfarmMP93_08-11-1968richmakse.jpg (125140 bytes)08/11/1968 View NE
Photo: Richard F. Makse
sillsdairyremainsViewN2009.jpg (71778 bytes)The decaying remains of Sills bing.com aerial photo. View N. 2009

sillsfarmggreenportmap.jpg (26225 bytes)
Sill's Dairy Farm located near LIRR MP 93 just south 
of NY State Route 25 (Main Rd, Front St.) 

 

sillsframgreenportwestmap.jpg (15816 bytes)

sillsframgreenportwestmapclose.jpg (11656 bytes)
Maps indicate Sills Rd at this location

 NEW YORK - EAST RIVER - NEWTOWN CREEK - DUTCH KILLS - Bridge Closure 

DutchKillsSwingBridge.jpg (426152 bytes)The Long Island Railroad Swing Railroad (DB) Bridge across Dutch Kills at mile 1.1 will be closed to marine traffic until further notice due to structural damage and deterioration of the center pier. The bridge is no longer operable as a swing bridge. Mariners are advised to plan accordingly.  12/30/8 Chart 12335 LNM 04/08 (CGD1)

LIRR EMPLOYEE RECORDS

LICcanopyandstation.jpg (45289 bytes)
Replacement terminal building and offices at LI City 
c. late 1914-1920 Collection: Dave Morrison

All employee records for the LIRR were kept at the employment office at the Long Island City terminal. When the structure was destroyed by fire on December 18, 1902, all employee records were destroyed.

It was a major loss. They lost records of employees dating back to the beginning of the railroad in the 1840s and 1850s as well as employees who were, at the time, currently employed.

As the Montauk Steamboat Co. was a subsidiary of the LIRR, I would think their employee records were also stored at the LI City terminal.


I'm sure that the LIRR made attempts to gather hiring data, promotion data, etc. from employees who were in current service to update a new employee database and that database was transferred to Jamaica when it was opened in 1913 and became the main railroad offices, housing the employee department as well.  (I have a seniority roster of engineers and firemen dated 1947 and the top dogs on the list have hiring dates from the 1890s, so this lost data must have been re-recorded by word of mouth) 

However,  what happened to those records is unclear, probably dumped over the years along with the valuation glass plate negatives from 1919-1921 by order of Thomas Goodfellow.

The current LIRR employee department is of no help in providing employee records that are "old" from what I've been told. Dave Keller, LIRR Historian  12/30/2008

LIRR MILEPOST CALCULATIONS 

MP1HunterspointAveLICc1999.jpg (66570 bytes)LIRR mileage WAS calculated from LI City until Penn station opened in 1910. mileage is ALWAYS from L. I. City they are correct, but only as of 1942-43.


Then, mileage was calculated from Penn with the exception of the Montauk branch which, surprisingly enough, was STILL calculated from LI City and the Atlantic branch whose mileage was calculated from Flatbush Ave. 

While the LIRR calculated their mileage from LI City, the SSRR calculated theirs from their terminal in Bushwick.

As a result, their route varied slightly from the LIRR’s later Montauk branch , AND, due to many track realignments over the years, their mileage varied from the LIRR’s mileage between the same two points, but only, on average by about ¼ to ½ mile or so. It wasn’t more than ¼ to ½ mile different at that point. 

I'm sorry to say that I have absolutely NO idea as to when the mileposts were put in place.

Judging by the differing styles I've seen in photos over the years, they were obviously put in place at different times . . . perhaps to replace a broken or stolen one or perhaps to indicate corrected mileage when track work was done. There were many locations on LI where curves were removed and tracks realigned, thus cutting off distances at varying locations.

As many of those old photos I've seen show nicely manicured markers, the railroad must've sent a crew out every several years or so to paint them back to legibility. Back then, their only enemy was the elements of weather. Today we have vandals added to the mix. Dave Keller, LIRR Historian  12/18/2008, Archive Photo: MP1 Hunterspoint Ave,  LI City view east, north side of tracks, at east end of station platform  c. 1999

AGENT, AGENCY, & TICKET CLERK 

Sta-Central Islip-Int-1928.jpg (52762 bytes)An "AGENT" was the representative of the railroad.

A "Ticket Clerk" was NOT an agent and, as a result was not THE official representative of the railroad in all business thereunto pertaining.

Yes . . .  he or she was recognized as  a railroad employee, but did not have the authorization to handle any paperwork other than ticket sales without the permission of his or her next-in-command . . . . . the Agent.

That is why stations had multiple ticket clerks but only ONE Agent.

An Agent's job was to transact ALL railroad business: freight, baggage, express, ticket sales, etc., etc. Ticket Clerks were assigned jobs at stations to assist the Agent in his duties.

By being set up at a depot and being a representative of the railroad at that venue, said depot was known as an "Agency" of the LIRR.

In later years, when freight and express business ended on the LIRR, and as many of the older agents retired and were not replaced, remaining agents were placed in charged of multiple stations and head ticket clerks were assigned to many of the outlying ticket offices, with extra ticket clerks coming in to assist during busy days for sales of commutation tickets.  Of course, this was not the case for the major terminals, who always had a bank of ticket clerks assigned.

Just like offices of Western Union had signs up that read "Western Union Agency Here" and you went into the drug store and were able to send a telegram.

When a ticket office closed and all paper business ended . .. no more freight, express, ticket sales, etc., etc. and the manpower was removed and the depot building only used as a shelter against the elements, it was referred to as the agency being closed. In later years the closing of an agency only meant no more ticket windows as most of the railroad paper work (freight, express, etc., etc. ) was no longer handled by the agent and his assistants. Take Railway Express for example. They had their own employees usually operating from the freight office, assuming the location was large enough i.e. Patchogue.

When my description states, for example "Agency Closed: 1958" that meant that, in 1958, the Agent was removed from the premises, along with all his papers, documents, ledgers, forms, tickets etc., etc. and the job abolished. No more ticket sales. The window was closed. You could no longer check your baggage at that location. You could no longer ship anything or receive shipment at that location.

My description of Islip reads that the 2nd depot was placed IN SERVICE  in 1963. My next line reads "Agency Closed: ?" Meaning that the official LIRR station agent was removed at a later date and the office closed, but I have no idea of that date. Dave Keller, LIRR Historian 12/28/2008 Archive Photo: Central Islip Station Interior 1928

TRACTION BLVD

Traction Blvd. has always been named thus as the storage battery cars of the Suffolk Traction Company ran down the center of the street on their way to and from the LIRR station at Holtsville.

It branched off OLD North Ocean Avenue at the southeast corner of Canaan Lake and headed in a northwesterly direction, stubbing out at the woods at the end of the paved road and a dirt trail (old ROW) continued on to Holtsville station. The dirt trail was visible where it crossed Woodside Avenue and then disappeared entirely at the latter-day site of the town dump where it was completely obliterated. It picked up again in the woods on the east side of Waverly Avenue just south of Katz's Farm which was located directly south of the LIRR station in Holtsville. The ROW ran along the edge of Katz's Farm so was not discernible. 

But Traction Blvd. was always just that . . . . . it was NOT Ocean Avenue or North Ocean Avenue or anything else. Dave Keller, LIRR Historian 01/13/09

STEAM ENGINE SPEEDS

During the late forties and early fifties, there were occasional unofficial "speed records" set westbound between PARK and HOLLIS. With no grade crossings west of Floral Park, the temptation was great to open-em-up. The train sheets maintained at PARK, QUEENS and HOLLIS would likely give-up-the-ghost on G-5s and K-4s powered trains. 75 MPH and 80 MPH would occur from time to time. The C-LIners would sometimes strut their horses and be worthy of a stopwatch.

As you may recall, the lead time on the "circuit was much greater on the manned crossings than it is with the automatic gate/signal protected crossings of today. The circuit was usually tripped about a mile from the crossing which offered approximate one-minute protection at 60 MPH. The whistle posts ('W') were set 1/4 mile from the crossing. At 60 MPH, it took 15 seconds to travel that distance and to get out that ---- ----- 0 ---- on the whistle or horn. At 70 MPH, that distance (1320') would be covered in 12.8 seconds.

These "highball" trips were usually run in this fashion in the later evening hours during the hours of darkness. 
Pappy, St. George, UT

Fastest LIRR schedules Jamaica to Speonk, from Timetable review:

May 1923 90 min......41.8 Mph
Oct 1925 88 min....... 42.8 Mph
June 1941 76 min...... 49.5 Mph
June 1946 79 min...... 47.6 Mph
June 1949 78 min......48.2 Mph

The last two specify via the Central Branch-- i.e. about 62.3 miles; the 1920s schedules may be via Manorville, 63.1 miles. I have averaged the branches to obtain: = 62.7 miles. Calculations: Steve Lynch

BAY RIDGE YARD WAS A LIRR SWITCH JOB

During the years the BAT (Brooklyn Army Terminal) was in operation they used their own motive power and possibly some LIRR as far as I know. I've seen photos of Army engines down there. I do believe Bush just ran through or maybe just up to the BAT with interchange cars.

Bay Ridge yard was a LIRR switch job. LIRR handled all the floats, drilling, etc. NH ran the road trains. LIRR assembled them in the yard for NH power to get and run up the connecting. (NYCRR)

After BAT went civil, I doubt there were any customers that received cars inside anymore. Cross had 2 customers there that got cars on one of the piers. NEMCO I think it was (to lazy to go look up my own website) got the Port Authority PATH cars rebuilt there and the other got TOFC cars with trailers.

Photo from LIFE inside the Eastern portion of the BAT. Today there's a pair of LIRR P72s and a Bar-Gen sitting in there...they were used for an Elvis movie. Landlocked now. Paul Strubeck 01/2009

FARMINGDALE AGRICULTURAL ROOTS PHOTO

Farmingdale's agricultural roots are reflected in this circa 1940 scene looking north on Merritt Road near the intersection of Conklin Street (Hempstead Turnpike). The LIRR Central Branch crossing is in the foreground, and that of the Main Line is north of the intersection. Farmingdale Feed Co. is also seen at the northeast corner of this intersection.
Farmingdale1940.jpg (56326 bytes)

 CONTINENTAL BAKING COMPANY - HISTORY OF JAMAICA LIRR SPOT #16

The history of Jamaica spot #16!

JamaicaFreight19.jpg (152613 bytes)

1. The cross street is 170th St.
2. It was originally built in 1905-06 as a siding for the Shultz Bread Company.
3. The siding never crossed 168th St. to the west but stopped some distance (no idea how much) short of the street. 
4. In 1924, a replacement siding was installed, Shultz Bread changed ownership and the name was changed, according to Emery, to Continental Baking Co. here was NO indication of another bakery name on his map between the time of Shultz and the change to Continental. The siding for the Continental Baking Co. (Wonder Bread) was located on the south side of the tracks, west of Hillside, between 168th and 170th streets.

It was probably reworked (especially at the connection to the main) 
after the Jamaica-East Improvement project in 1930-31 when the ROW was elevated from Jamaica through Union Hall St. and Hillside.

In 1925, the Continental Baking Company bought the Taggart Baking Company of Indianapolis and “Slo-baked” "Wonder Bread" soon became a national brand. 

Pre 2004 Wonder Logo

The Continental Baking Company altered the course of  bread forever in the 1930's when it introduced sliced Wonder Bread. Sales were slow at first as suspicious consumers were slow to accept a pre-sliced bread, but convenience overruled apprehension and soon everyone wanted sliced Wonder Bread on their dinner table. In 1995, Continental Baking was bought by Interstate Bakeries Corp. 

NEW GONDOLA ORDER 2009

LI6071HolbanYard01-03-09v3.JPG (72310 bytes) LI6071HolbanYard01-03-09v2.JPG (76537 bytes)
I was down in Fresh Pond the other day and saw a brand new LI gondola car numbered 6071. The Builder's decal said ebenezerlogo.jpg (40067 bytes) "Ebenezer Car Company - Buffalo, NY".  Built date on the side of the car is 9/2008. It's a 66 foot car with cushion couplers on each end. I was advised by one of my LIRR connections that these will be used in work train service, mostly for hauling ties. They were shot on 1/3/2009 at Holban Yard.  



Here is the first of fifteen to twenty new gondolas the LIRR will be receiving for work train service, mostly for ties. To my knowledge, this is the first new work equipment the LIRR has ordered in my lifetime. 

 

LAST OPERATION OF LIRR STEAM 

LIRR G5s # 35, #39, #50 Final Runs "Steam Specials" 

#50 October 2, 1955
#39 October 9, 1955
  #35 October 16, 1955

 

LastCall-Oct16-1955.jpg (62644 bytes)

portjeff_10-02-55_RobertEmery.jpg (74885 bytes)
LIRR G5s #50 FM C-Liner 2004 at Port Jefferson Station October 02, 1955  Photo: Robert Emery

LIRR39LastSteamWeekObay10-09-55.jpg (79117 bytes)
LIRR G5s #39 "Last Steam Week" at Oyster Bay  October 09, 1955  Photo: Art Huneke

lirr35finalrun10-16-55PJeffarthuneke.jpg (36589 bytes)
LIRR G5s #35 and final "Steam Special" at Port Jefferson Station ready to depart on the very last LIRR steam train run, October 16, 1955.  FM C-Liner 2402 at trackside. Photo: Art Huneke
G5s35-final-steam-run_10-16-55_Smithtown_Huneke.jpg (62983 bytes)
LIRR G5s #35 and final "Steam Special" at Smithtown Station ready to depart on the very last LIRR steam train run, October 16, 1955.  Photo: Art Huneke

END OF STEAM CEREMONY DEFINITIVE LIST October 8th, 1955

10/08/1955 Hicksville Engine #39 and car #2924 facing east & engine #35 and car #2923 facing west. Later, Alco diesel #1555 replaced #35 & #1556 replaced #39. #1555 operated back to Riverhead with #2923, but returned to Jamaica at 6:00PM with a different car of the same type.
Photo: John Krause Archive: Gary Everhart

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End-of-Steam Ceremony, LIRR, Hicksville, October 8, 1955: The question of which locos and cars were involved comes up again and again: here is the definitive list (by Bill Slade), Info: Art Huneke 

 

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Hicksville South Siding LIRR #39 and P72 # 2924 10/08/1955 Photo: Bill Slade Archive: Art Huneke

GE TURBINES

These cars did look like the M1s but had a different configuration along the roofline, probably due to whatever special equipment the unit contained. They also had "DOT" logos on the cars (Dept. of Transportation). 

I have a shot of #4001, 4002 and two other GTE cars, making up 4-car Oyster Bay train #515 at Mineola in June of 1977. I have individual roster shots of 4 of the cars (4002, 4003, 4004, 4006) taken at Oyster bay in May and July, 1977, each with the DOT logo. I guess that 1977 was the test year. Don't know if they stayed around longer than that. 
Info: Dave Keller

Yes, there were two competing vendors and they were paid for with DOT funds. 

I believe Garett made four and GE (Budd) made four. The two sets were not compatable and had significant differences. They all looked similar to M-1's with different details. They had the two tone "M" logos with a Federal or DOT logo on the end doors and the sides. 

For a few weeks one set made regular trips to Greenport in overnight testing. They were horribly noisy, sounding like a 747 at takeoff. You'd watch the lights go on in the farm houses enroute as you passed. They used trememdous amounts of fuel -- kerosene, as I recall and they stunk up the entire North Fork. I had the opportunity to operate one of them and they had M-1 type controls, but with a weard turbine-induced lag to the throttle response. 

They had to be compatable with low level platforms, and each vendor came up with its own solution. One had a "trap door" in the vestibule that slid open to reveal stairs. Anyone on the trap door would fall out. 

The other had folding stairs that dropped down under your feet -- another unnerving option. 

As Otto said, they had cool roll signs; I'm lucky enough to have grabbed one off the Garett set before they were scrapped. 

The GE set was converted for MetroNorth into M-1's (maybe M-3's?) by the Long Island Rail Road in Hillside Shops. They are probably still running today. The Garrett sets had "drop in" turbines that took a substantial part of the car and were deemed too much trouble to convert to electric. 

Before those cars came, the LIRR had another experimental turbine car they kept in a shed on the old wye in Ronkonkoma. That was also a DOT funded project that, I believe was made from a converted Budd coach in the early 1970's. Clem

These were Gas-Turbine powered cars which were also Dual-Mode, and found their ways on diesel lines for a very brief time. The problem with that was they were break down prone, they found themselves out quickly. And a few made their way onto the Metro North lines before Metro North took over, and were converted to straight electrics.. They were taken out of service shortly thereafter. Some were made by Garret, and some by I believe GE.
M1 9147 

Actually, what looks like a ventilation system on the top of the car actually is where the Gas Turbine engines were. They took up a significant amount of the roofline and were located opposite of the motorman's cab. 

Gas turbines really ARE that small. The one on the stillborn JetTrain was like the size of those garbage cans you see out on the curb on trash day.  And 5000 HP. Not much else packs that kind of power into such a tiny space.... 

I bet the generator 1/2 of those sets in the MTA cars was heavier and bigger...


LIRR Budd M1 GTEL's (gas turbine electrics) on the Oyster Bay branch approaching Roslyn Station June, 1976. LIRR had 2 versions in the 1970's, built by GE and Garrett. Only 8 of the M1's were built/modified this way.

SUNRISE HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION

Sunrise Highway construction began around 1925 from Queens to Massapequa. It was extended to Great River in 1940 and Patchogue in 1953. On the 1925 Freeport Aerial it looks as though Olive Blvd was the name of the east/west road where Sunrise is approximately today. It seems Merrick Road was the main east/west route along the south shore until Sunrise was constructed. 
freeport9-26-46.jpg (65662 bytes)   Merrick Rd., Freeport 9/26/1946  view SE  NYS Archives

W SIGNS ARE CALLED WHISTLE POSTS

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PRR Whistle & Ring Sign 05/1927 Specs

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PRR E6s #460 Wreck Train at Old Southern  Road, Laurelton 10/20/39 Archive: Dave Keller

On April 27, 2005, the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), which enforces rail safety regulations, published the final rule on the use of locomotive horns at highway-rail grade crossings. Effective June 24, 2005, the rule requires that locomotive horns be sounded at all public grade crossings at least 15 seconds, but not more than 20 seconds before entering a crossing. This rule applies when the train speed is below 45 mph (70 km/h). At 45 mph or above, trains are still required to sound their horn at the designated location (usually marked with a whistle post).

The pattern for blowing the horn remains two long, one short, and one long. This is to be repeated as necessary until the lead locomotive fully occupies the crossing. Locomotive engineers retain the authority to vary this pattern as necessary for crossings in close proximity, and are allowed to sound the horn in emergency situations no matter where the location
RULE 14 (l) * – – o – Trains or engines approaching public highway grade crossings shall sound the horn for at least 15 seconds, but no more than 20 seconds before the lead engine enters the crossing. Trains or engines traveling at speeds greater than 45 mph shall begin sounding the horn at or about, but not more than, one-quarter mile (1,320 feet) in advance of the nearest public crossing. Even if the advance warning provided by the horn will be less than 15 seconds in duration. This signal is to be prolonged or repeated until the engine or train occupies the crossing; or, where multiple crossing are involved, until the last crossing is occupied. 2. Approaching tunnels, yards, or other points where railroad workers may be at work. 3. Passing standing trains  Info: Bob Anderson 09/30/2008

LIRR EAST - WEST RULES 

A train is superior to another train by right or direction. Right is conferred by train order and is superior to direction. Eastward regular trains are superior by direction to westward regular trains, unless otherwise specified. 

Extra trains are inferior to regular trains.

Those are Rules S-71 and 73. Class is not included in the LIRR rules any more, only right and direction.

Look at superiority this way:

A regular train's authority is its timetable schedule. An eastward regular in the timetable is superior to a westward regular, unless otherwise specified. That unless otherwise specified would be a train order for instance, swapping superiority (Westward has right over eastward A to B). 

Another premise to remember is that there is no superiority between two extra trains, though at a meet between two extras, the extra in the westward direction would take the siding, unless otherwise specified in the train order.

A work train for instance, that needed to run to Montauk would get a run order from SK2 to Montauk. All opposing westward regulars would not be concerned about that extra since the extra is inferior (it doesn't have a schedule in the timetable either). A meet order would have to be issued between a regular train and that extra OR the extra would have to clear the time and block of any opposing regular trains by not less than 5 minutes (that extra's crew would have to check out the timetable and look up the times of opposing regular trains). 

Rule S-87 is also known as the "5 minute rule". It's a safety net that permits an inferior train to clear a superior train's time by not less than 5 minutes, if no meet order is issued. 

In other words, if Train A was a superior train and Train B was an inferior train, if no meet order was issued between the two and they are both regular trains (they have a timetable schedule), Train B would have to clear Train A's time 5 minutes in advance of Train A's time at C Block Limit.

That's a real simple way to look at it. There's more information that's needed to fully understand the way things work in 251 manual block territory, but it sort of gives you a basic knowledge of the operation. Info: Joe Tischner

EARLY DIESELS OF THE SUNRISE TRAIL

AA4-403A-No. 4th St Yd-Bklyn-c.1937.jpg (50278 bytes)In February of 1925, the LIRR briefly tested Ingersoll-Rand diesel demonstrator number 8835 at the request of the Pennsylvania Railroad. Impressed by its thermal efficiency (30% versus 6%-8% from a steam locomotive), the PRR contracted a team consisting of representatives from General Electric, Ingersoll-Rand, and ALCo to produce diesel locomotive serial number 6605, which would become LIRR #401. The locomotive was completed in 1926 right around the time that the LIRR was due to receive a trainload of spare parts from the GE plant in Erie, PA. For reasons lost to history, there would have been some significant delay in getting the locomotive and parts to Long Island if the LIRR waited to receive the train at an interchange, so they opted to dispatch their own crew to Erie to bring back the parts behind the new diesel. By doing this, the LIRR became the first railroad in the world to operate a diesel in road service.

LIRR #401 was not an ideal road service locomotive, however. As a boxcab locomotive, the first point of contact in a collision would be the engineer's control room (to call it a cab would be a stretch!). As a result, the next few years saw the development of three other kinds of diesel locomotive: the switcher, the road switcher, and the cab unit (or carbody diesel). 

The ALCo S-1, a switcher type locomotive, was the first locomotive order in bulk for the LIRR. The first S-1 was delivered to Long Island in 1945. They were numbered 413 through 421 and delivered wearing the standard black Pennsylvania paint. The S-1 boasted a 660 h.p. engine and claimed a tractive effort rating of 29, 200 kN. The LIRR would own other switchers, including several Baldwin units, but in terms of appearance and performance, they were much the same as the S-1. What distinguished the S-1 and these others as switchers was the long hood situated in front of a cab with a flat panel behind it. This gave the engineer an ideal view of cars behind him for coupling to and then switching cars. Running the locomotive "glass-out," however, did not offer much, if any, protection in the event of a collision.

Partly in response to this, ALCo developed its road switcher series, which was suited for switching cars but also boasted the motive power and safety specifications to work in main line service. The road switcher situation an additional short hood behind the cab that, according to ALCo, offered an equivalent amount of protection to the long hood. The practice, however, was still to run these locomotives long hood forward because several of the LIRR units had a Vapor-Clarkson steam generator, for heating coaches, installed in the short hood. The RS-1s, first delivered to the LIRR in 1948, brought a 1,000 h.p. engine and a tractive effort of 34,000 kN. Numbered 461 through 469, they were delivered in the same Pennsy-style scheme as the S-1s. These would be complemented by the purchase of the RS-3s (numbered 1551 through 1560) in 1955, which featured 1,600 h.p. and a tractive effort of 46,000 kN. Then, the LIRR made some mistakes.

1951 saw the purchase of the Fairbanks-Morse H16-44, a road switcher type locomotive that brought 1,600 h.p. and a tractive effort of 36,600 kN to the already impressive LIRR fleet. These were followed by the purchase of F-M's C-liner locomotives, which were carbody diesels. The design, pioneered by EMD in 1939 with its FT-series of locomotive, situated the engine behind the cab such that running this locomotive in reverse operation for road service was impossible. The CPA20-5s, numbered 2001 through 2008, combined 2,000 h.p. with 36,000 kN of tractive effort. They were followed by the CPA24-5s, which featured 2,400 h.p.. These were numbered 2401 through 2404. 

All of the F-M locomotives were notorious gas and oil guzzlers and featured still-unproven locomotive technology. The "revolutionary" opposed-piston engine F-M installed was not well-tested in locomotives and, in part because of this, the C-Liners were essentially the DMs of the 1950s, requiring bail outs more often than they completed their trips. F-M ceased locomotive manufacture in 1958, which is a large part of the reason that the LIRR sold off or traded all of these locomotives by the early 1960s. Several went to ALCo to cover part of the cost of the C420s and others were sold off to various places. The most interesting home a C-Liner would find was a merchant marine ship - at least one of the engines from a CPA24-5 found a new home powering a small merchant marine vessel, which was (and still is) the ideal home for an F-M opposed piston engine. Something tells me the DMs won't find such interesting homes after LI is rid of them...  P.S. more to come on the modern diesels in coming weeks.  Info: Kyle Mullins  12/18/2007  Photo Archive: Dave Keller AA4 #403A No. 4th St Yd-Brooklyn c.1937

BARNEY or MULE at SUNNYSIDE YARD, LI CITY SHOPS

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"Barney" in pit at Sunnyside Yard, LI City c.1958

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Sunnyside Yard Shop Facilities, LI City  Map 05/20/46
"X" at right marks location of photo view west towards turntable in background. 

The “Multiple Unit Repair Shop” and "Multiple Unit Inspection Pits" indicated on the Sunnyside Yard  Rendering c.1905 later became the engine house, ash pits(?), and Barney locations respectively.

Could very well be that, in 1905, as there were NO dreams of GG1 locomotives at the time, everything WAS built for MU service. AND . . . those pits could very well have been inspection pits, originally. Years later, with the onset of B3 electrics, DD1 electrics and GG1 electrics, usage was converted from MU service to locomotive service and the pits, et. al. were refitted accordingly . . . Changing the inspection purpose to dead engine pulling. Barneys are devices that come up from a pit between the rails and engage the coupler and pull/push the car to the desired spot. The Sunnyside one(s) are considered typical.

LIRR M1 TESTING in BRIDGEPORT, CT

lirrM1testing JenkinsCurveBridgeportCT1969HankRaudenbush.jpg (73828 bytes)The location is at Jenkins Curve, Bridgeport.   This is the curve south of the station and the underjump the to former freight yard; also the location where the "Federal" once came to grief. It is a 6 degree curve, and about the sharpest on the line. Like most of the curves on the line, it was laid out when the line was 4-tracked about 1895, reflecting the rolling stol of that time, and boxed in forever when the catenary bridges were built in 1914. The track centers are very tight for such a sharp curve, with the required superelevation!
 
Some time in 1970, when LIRR had received about 100 M-1's, the M-2's were on order, and the M-1a's were just being ordered, four pairs of LIRR M-1's were sent to what was then the Metropolitan Region of Penn Central. This was to give Metro an advance look at these cars, and also for some clearance tests.  Two pair of M-1's were towed to Bridgeport by a pair of FL-9's, and parked at this location. After a couple of P-C trains went by, the FL-9's uncoupled one pair and ran it by at track speed (30) on the outer track, while the other pair stood on the inner track. 

This way they would be rolled toward each other. The Penn Central clearance engineer (Greenlee?) had a set of small feelers, 6 inches long, which he taped to the widest point on the standing cars. They were not touched, so he was satisfied. Of course, while the M-1's had the same shape as the M-2 they didn't have the same truck and suspension. When the M-2's came, they had too much roll and the tip of the pan almost touched the arm of one semaphore near "Peck". That was why a few M-2's were sent to the Shea Stadium test site on the LIRR, so that GE. could work on modifications to the suspension. They hardly had room at their South Norwalk site for that work.
 
The M-1's loaned to Metropolitan Region were briefly in passenger service on the Harlem line, as well.  Photo/Research: Hank Raudenbush